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Mobile Care
Location: Italy
Abstract:

In a country with more than 1,600,000 deaf-mutes, Telecom Italia teamed up with the cooperation of ENS (National Agency for Deaf-Mutes) to allow the use of cellular phones and mobile telephony services in sign language free of charge in Italy.The project, named Mobile Care, has been in operation since December 2005.

Through the project, the user connects to Mobile TV and selects a function. Then, a virtual assistant displayed on the screen of the mobile phone uses Italian Sign Language to provide information concerning the use of mobile phones and relevant services. As a result of Mobile Care, Telecom Italia Mobile (TIM) has improved the accessibility of display panels and services, such as video calls and mobile Internet connection for the hearing- and speech-impaired.



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• Deaf-Alerter

• EMPORIA TELECOM ANNOUNCES IT WILL PROVIDE SPECIALTY PHONES FOR FIRST MOBILE PHONE SERVICE IN US DESIGNED FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED

• Telecoms Trends for 2016: Big Data, M2M, Wearables

• Does Much of ICT Accessibility Revolve around Language?

• ITU Telecom World 2015, Budapest, Hungary


Website: Mobile Care
Practitioner Name: n/a
Practitioner Tel: +39-011-4356503
Practitioner E-mail: corporate.affairs@telecomitalia.it

NonVisual Desktop Access (NVDA)
Location: Australia
Abstract:

NonVisual Desktop Access (NVDA) is a free and open source screen reader for the Microsoft Windows operating system developed by  NV Access, a non-profit organization based in Australia, with contributions from the community. Providing feedback via synthetic speech and Braille, it enables blind or vision impaired people to access computers running Windows for no more cost than a sighted person. Major features include support for over 20 languages and the ability to run entirely from a USB drive with no installation.

Providing feedback via synthetic speech and Braille, NVDA allows blind and vision impaired people to access and interact with the Windows operating system and many third party applications. Apart from providing its messages and interface in several languages, NVDA can also enable the user to read content in any language, as long as they have a speech synthesizer that can speak that language.

Major highlights include support for popular applications including web browsers, email clients, internet chat programs and office suites; built-in speech synthesizer supporting over 20 languages; announcement of textual formatting where available such as font name and size, style and spelling errors; automatic announcement of text under the mouse and optional audible indication of the mouse position; support for many refreshable Braille displays; ability to run entirely from a USB stick or other portable media without the need for installation; easy to use talking installer; support for modern Windows Operating Systems including both 32 and 64 bit variants; ability to run on Windows logon and other secure screens; support for common accessibility interfaces such as Microsoft Active Accessibility, Java Access Bridge, IAccessible2 and UI Automation; and support for Windows Command Prompt and console applications.


Related Items:

• Delivering Inclusive Access for Disablied or Elderly Members

• G3ICT LAUNCHES WORLDWIDE PUSH FOR PUBLIC PROCUREMENT OF ACCESSIBLE TECHNOLOGY

• U.S. Access Board to Hold Panel Discussions on Communication Access

• Nominations Open for U.S. FCC Chairman’s Award for Advancement in Accessibility (AAA)

• UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's Address

• Webinar: Section 508 Best Practice: Basic Testing Guide for Making an Accessible PDF


Website: NonVisual Desktop Access (NVDA)
Practitioner Name: n/a
Practitioner Tel: +61-7-5667-8372
Practitioner E-mail: admin@nvaccess.org

Postsecondary Education Network International
Location: United States
Abstract:

Funded by the Nippon Foundations since 2001, the Postsecondary Education Network International (PEN-International) is a project of the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) to help colleges throughout the world improve technological education for their deaf students. Deaf students attending specific colleges in Japan, China, Russia, the Philippines, Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong, and the Czech Republic have benefited from PEN-International's expertise through improved curriculum, increased access, new technology, multimedia labs, and trained faculty. More recently, PEN-International has been conducting training in the areas of sign language instruction, interpreter training, automation technology, and counseling skills. PEN-International hopes to thus expand career opportunities for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.
 
The PEN-International Program has ended. However, a PEN-Secretariat is still being maintained at NTID. 


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• DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System)

• THE NIPPON FOUNDATION AND G3ICT ENTER IN LONG TERM COOPERATION AGREEMENT TO PROMOTE DIGITAL ACCESSIBILITY FOR SENIORS AND PERSONS WITH DISABILTIES

• Helpline Launched for People with Vision Disabilities in India

• Large Scale Cloud-Based Assistive Technologies Deployment in Northern Italy

• The Wireless Foundation Mobile Health and Wellness Expo, Washington, D.C., USA


Website: Postsecondary Education Network International
Practitioner Name: James J. DeCaro
Practitioner Tel: +1-585-475-7515
Practitioner E-mail: jjd8074@rit.edu

Project Crystal
Location: United Kingdom
Abstract:

Project Crystal was started at the University of Reading, in co-operation with the University of Hertfordshire, in October 1999. The project seeks to understand how color and light in public buildings affect deaf and hard of hearing people’s communication skills. Deaf and hard of hearing people know that not all buildings are the same when it comes to communication. The type and level of light, the colour and patterns on the wall behind the speaker can affect both signing and lip-reading. We often hear of deaf people complaining about ‘visual dizziness’ when a room has busy decorations and/or wallpaper with complicated patterns. We are also aware of how hard it is to communicate by signing or lip-reading when the light is dim or too bright and just behind the speaker. However, there is little research which looks at everyday decoration and lighting and their impact on communication.

The goal of this research project is to better understand the issues which have an effect on the deaf and hard of hearing communities. The project will also issue design guidance for good practice, so that public buildings can be more accessible and comfortable for all. Other partners involved in the project include: Deafax Trust, RNID, BDA, Deafblind UK, Royal Berkshire and Battle Hospital Trust, UK Council on Deafness, City University-London, Amey Plc and the Centre for Accessible Environments.



Related Items:

• The Archimedes Project

• ODIN MOBILE ANNOUNCES THE FIRST MOBILE SERVICE DEDICATED TO THE BLIND AND PERSONS WITH LOW VISION

• Zero Project Launches Call for Nominations of Innovative Policies 2017 on Employment

• Project F123.org Enables Access to Educational and Employment Opportunities Through Free and Open Source Assistive Technologies

• Zero Project Conference 2016: Innovative Policies and Practices on Inclusive Education and ICT, Vienna, Austria


Website: Project Crystal
Practitioner Name: Ms Tracey Wigmore
Practitioner Tel: +44-118-9864253
Practitioner E-mail: t.wigmore@reading.ac.uk

Providing Education by Bringing Learning Environments to Students (PEBBLES)
Location: Canada
Abstract:

Providing Education by Bringing Learning Environments to Students (PEBBLES) is an innovative system that combines video conferencing technologies with simple robotics technology to allow a student confined to the hospital or to home to attend his or her regular school. PEBBLES places one of its units inside the classroom and its counterpart in the hospital or home of the student. The system allows the student to maintain both a connection to and a presence in his or her normal learning environment. The overarching goal of pebbles is to create a healthier and less stressful environment for a student who is hospitalized or who has a disability. Currently PEBBLES units are being used across Canada in Ottawa, London, and Toronto. Our corporate partner Telbotics acquired funding to deploy PEBBLES in the United States in 2001/2002.



Related Items:

• Trinity College of Music

• G3ICT AND ADOBE NEW REPORT, ‘KEY TO APPS PORTABILITY FOR ALL USERS,’ DRAWS ATTENTION TO ACCESSIBILITY-ENABLING CROSS-PLATFORM APP DEVELOPMENT

• USA: Most K-12 Online Learning Content Does Not Meet Needs of Students with Disabilities

• NEA Suggests NAEP Test Items Be Written in "Plain English" for Students with Disabilities

• 2nd National Conference: Teaching and Supporting Students with Special Needs, Sydney, Australia


Website: Providing Education by Bringing Learning Environments to Students (PEBBLES)
Practitioner Name: Dr Deborah Fels
Practitioner Tel: +1-416-979-5000
Practitioner E-mail: dfels@ryerson.ca

RoboBraille
Location: Denmark
Abstract:

RoboBraille is an email-based translation service capable of translating documents to and from contracted Braille and to synthetic speech. The service is available free of charge to all non-commercial users. Users submit documents (e.g., text files, Word documents, HTML pages) as email attachments. The translated results are then returned to the user via email – typically within a matter of minutes. The user can send an e-mail with a document attachment to one of several e-mail accounts used to manage the translation process (e.g., eightdot@robobraille.org for eight-dot Braille translation; sixdot@robobraille.org for six-dot Braille translation). Similarly, localized versions of the e-mail accounts are used to control the language-specific translations, as well as the language of any response sent back to the user. As an example, mail to ottepunkt@robobraille.org will result in Danish eight-dot Braille translation and a user response in Danish, whereas mail to sixdot@robobraille.org will result in English six-dot Braille translation and a user response in English. Additionally, RoboBraille can change text to speech through a similar process which turns a document into an MPE audio file. Users can control the speech rate by inserting plusses or minuses into the subject line of their emails, anywhere along the spectrum in which three minuses (---) result in the slowest speech rate and three plusses (+++) result in the fastest speech rate.

Contact varies by country; for a complete list of contacts, please click here: http://www.robobraille.org/rb/subpage1049.aspx




Website: RoboBraille
Practitioner Name: Lars Ballieu Christensen
Practitioner Tel: +45-48221003
Practitioner E-mail: contact@robobraille.org

Sightsavers Dolphin Pen
Location: Kenya
Abstract:

Sightsavers International, a NGO based in the UK, is working with the Dolphin Company to provide visually impaired students and individuals in Africa equal access and independence in computer use. The new Sightsavers Dolphin Pen is a small piece of technology providing users with the freedom and flexibility to use any computer without the hassles of finding special software or having to depend on assistance. The product is simple: a pen drive preloaded with a formatted screen reader and magnification software, allowing the user to carry his or her enabling software with him or her for use on any computer.

Partnering with Sightsavers, Dolphin is providing Sightsavers Dolphin Pens to schools all over Africa so that visually impaired students can be educated side-by-side fully-sighted children. Whereas previously there would be approximately one computer for every 30 visually impaired students (drastically slowing their education), now students can use their screen reading software on all computers, giving them equal access to education. In a country plagued by a 45% unemployment rate, giving visually impaired students the ability to learn at the same rate as sighted children secures their prospects, as they enter the job market as adults.



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• “Breaking Down Barriers” International Disability Film Festival

• IAAP AND G3ict TO APPOINT FUNKA AS THEIR JOINT REPRESENTATIVE TO THE EUROPEAN UNION

• China: Screen Reading Applications Bring Light to People with Vision Disabilities

• UNIC Moscow: Participation in the 3rd International Conference of the Moscow City Government's "Equal Rights - Equal Opportunities" Program, 1 July 2011

• W4A 2012: 9th International Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility, Lyon, France


Website: Sightsavers Dolphin Pen
Practitioner Name: n/a
Practitioner Tel: +44-1905-754577
Practitioner E-mail: info@dolphinuk.co.uk

Software Access Centre
Location: United Kingdom
Abstract:

The Royal National Institute for the Blind in the United Kingdom has launched an accessibility resource website - Software Access Centre - concerning accessibility issues related to software. While most websites devoted to accessibility issues concern the accessibility of online data and websites, this initiative provides information, advice, and guidelines for software developers to design software programs that meet the accessibility guidelines being set in the UK. The center is also useful for software designers and developers, systems integrators, procurement professionals and accessibility policy makers.

The “Software Access Center” provides examples of best practices among software designs, as well as advice on how to easily make the program accessible. Furthermore, information on laws, standards, testing, and evaluation are posted in order to give developers a better understanding of the necessities and expectations for software accessibility. The Royal National Institute for the Blind also provides a list of five key recommendations to help observe first-hand how disabled users will interact with the program.



Related Items:

• EZ Access

• G3ICT AND GLOBAL ACCESSIBILITY LEADERS ANNOUNCE PROCUREMENT CHARTER

• UK Charity Sues Airline for Inaccessible Website

• Techshare: Putting Accessibility to Information Centre Stage in India

• UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's Address

• Web Accessibility Training Day by NFB and Maryland Technology Assistance Program, Baltimore, MD, USA


Website: Software Access Centre
Practitioner Name: Technology Team
Practitioner Tel: +44-303-123-9999
Practitioner E-mail: digitalaccess@rnib.org.uk

Talking Tins
Location: United Kingdom
Abstract:

“Talking Tins” is a recent project of Talking Products Ltd., which specializes in devices for the visually impaired. Talking Tins helps blind persons or those with cognitive disabilities to determine the contents of canned food, as well as identify other household containers, such as bottles, sprays, and storage containers. The product comes in the form of a magnetic cap that sits on top of any sized tin. The cap allows a person to record a short voice message up to ten seconds, which can then be played back at any time with the touch of a button. It can also be strapped onto other containers. The Talking Tin is reusable, as the voice messages are re-recordable.



Related Items:

• Trinity College of Music

• EMPORIA TELECOM ANNOUNCES IT WILL PROVIDE SPECIALTY PHONES FOR FIRST MOBILE PHONE SERVICE IN US DESIGNED FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED

• Talking Cash Machines Win Technology4Good Award

• Press Release from Council of Canadians with Disabilities

• IEEE Workshop on Multimodal and Alternative Perception for Visually Impaired People (MAP4VIP), San Jose, USA


Website: Talking Tins
Practitioner Name: Mr Brian Stickley
Practitioner Tel: +44-1794-278327
Practitioner E-mail: Brian@TalkingProducts.com
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The Archimedes Project
Location: United States
Abstract:

The Archimedes Project was founded in 1992 at Stanford University, relocating to the University of Hawaii in 2003. The project's goal is to ensure that all people are able to fully participate in the global information society, regardless of individual needs, abilities, preferences and culture.
 
The project works to address the inequalities that Persons with Disabilities face by making information appliances accessible. In 1997, the project's Total Access System was recognized as one of the top five innovations in computer engineering and electronics. The system in question can provide access to computers and other electronic devices via speech recognition, head and eye tracking, and other "human-centered interfaces", enabling those who are physically disabled to have access to these technologies in the same ways as able-bodied persons do.


Related Items:

• Project Crystal

• ODIN MOBILE ANNOUNCES THE FIRST MOBILE SERVICE DEDICATED TO THE BLIND AND PERSONS WITH LOW VISION

• Zero Project Launches Call for Nominations of Innovative Policies 2017 on Employment

• Project F123.org Enables Access to Educational and Employment Opportunities Through Free and Open Source Assistive Technologies

• UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's Address

• Zero Project Conference 2016: Innovative Policies and Practices on Inclusive Education and ICT, Vienna, Austria


Website: The Archimedes Project
Practitioner Name: Neil Scott
Practitioner Tel: +808-842-9857
Practitioner E-mail: ngscott@hawaii.edu

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