G3ict is the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs

G3ict: The Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs
Find Us: FacebookTwitterLinkedInFlickrRSS Share:
Search | Site Map | Contact
You're currently not logged in. Login | Register
Home  »  Resource Center  »  G3ict Newsletter  »  News
Viviana Montenegro

Inclusive Policy


Subscribe to Newsletter
Tell a Friend
Print this Page

11/12/2013

Better Deployment of Accessible Electronic Kiosks and ATMs for Persons with Disabilities


G3ict Research Analyst Viviana Montenegro highlights best practices on financial services accessibility as published in the CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report.

G3ict Leads Disability sessions at the Financial Inclusion 2020 Global Forum

Image: G3ict Leads Disability Sessions at the Financial Inclusion Forum 2020 in London on October 28-30, 2013. Seen here on extreme right, G3ict President and Executive Director Axel Leblois, next to him, Ambassador Luis Gallegos, G3ict Chair. Third from left is Pina D'Intino, G3ict Lead on the Survey of Financial Services Accessibility of Banks and Financial Institutions.

Access to banks, financial services and programs is becoming a more relevant topic today. As stated by the Center for Financial Inclusion, 15 percent of the world’s adult population, or 785 million people, live with a type of disability and there is certainly a compelling necessity to raise awareness of their unique needs and assets. To achieve an inclusive financial system, financial services have to meet first the unique needs of all individuals, especially those of the most underserved and vulnerable groups, among them, persons with disabilities (PWD).

In the recently concluded Financial Inclusion 2020 Global Forum (October 28-30, 2013) where G3ict lead the disability sessions, we learnt that technology needs to reach its full potential for an inclusive system. For this to happen, regulatory frameworks in countries around the world need to be changed. In this regard, some data from the CPRD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report could be of value to better address the challenges for accessible public electronic kiosks or Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) around the world.

As background information, the Progress Report – now in its third edition – is a snapshot of each State Party revealing the dispositions of the CRPD (Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities) on accessible ICTs and Assistive Technologies actually in place in each surveyed country through their laws, policies and regulations, and its impact. The data collected this year (2013) includes 75 State Party countries corresponding to 68 percent of the world’s population and is organized in three segments.

  • The first one inquires about the State Party CRPD legal and commitments’ status;
  • The second inquires about the State Party capacity for implementation; and
  • The third one assesses the State’s implementation and actual results for persons with disabilities.

The results yielded by the study to see the countries’ status and level of compliance were obtained by applying inferential and descriptive statistical analysis.

As part of the inferential statistical analysis, we performed Logistic Regressions to understand the relationships or effects of variables contained in the survey. In this case, we explored the effect that regulatory conditions have on the countries’ implementation and their impact. Based on our recent CRPD study, there is a relationship between legal regulations (analyzed as independent variables) and accessible public kiosks and ATMs in place in the country (considered as dependent variables in the analysis).

For instance, if the country has a definition of "Reasonable Accommodation" included in its law or regulation pertaining to the rights of persons with disabilities (p value=0.003455), it is more likely that accessible public electronic kiosks or ATMs would be deployed in the country. In addition, if the country counts on a legal framework that facilitates access by persons with disabilities to quality mobility aids, devices, assistive technologies, and forms of live assistance and intermediaries available at affordable cost (p value =0.013467), it is more likely that it will have accessible ATMs or public kiosks in place as well.

Graph 1 - accessible public electronic kiosks or ATMs deployed in surveyed countries

Graph 1: 62 percent of the surveyed countries do not have accessible kiosks or ATMs

As shown by the descriptive statistical analysis, there is a need for improvement in deploying accessible electronic public kiosks and ATMs among the State Party countries. As demonstrated by Graph 1, 62 percent of the surveyed countries do not have accessible kiosks or ATMs. To better understand the scenario, the data was analyzed by country level of income and by region. 71 percent of the high income countries (table 1: below) do have them in place; however, there is a huge gap compared to upper-middle (38 percent), lower-middle (25 percent), and low income countries (20 percent). The data per region shows that Africa (table 3: below) faces the most challenges since it needs to better adapt its legal regulatory (43 percent of compliance) framework to set up the conditions for implementing more accessible electronic kiosks and ATMs (27 percent of implementation, as shown in table 2: below).

As shown in table 3 (below), States Parties in Africa (43%) and Asia (50%) need to have a definition of "Reasonable Accommodation" included in any law or regulation regarding the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in order to better implement accessible public electronic kiosks and ATMs. In addition, Asia (50%), Africa (43%) and Latin America and the Caribbean (45%) have to facilitate access by persons with disabilities to quality mobility aids, devices, Assistive Technologies and forms of live assistance and intermediaries, and make them available at an affordable cost for improved deployment.

Table 1: Information for Special Services per Country's Level of Income

 Values (Average)

High Income

Upper Middle

Lower Middle

Low Income

 Accessible public electronic kiosks or ATMs

 71%

 38%

 25%

 20%







Table 2: Information for Special Services per Region

Values (Averages)

  Africa  

 Asia 

 Europe 

  Latin America and 
The Caribbean 

 Oceania 

 Accessible public electronic kiosks or ATMs  

 27%

 36%

 41%

58%

 67%

 

 


Table 3: Reasonable Accomodation by States Parties to the Convention - Asia, Africa, Latin America and The Caribbean, and Oceania

 States Parties Level of CRPD Accessibility
 Compliance by Region
 Africa Asia
 Europe Latin America and The Caribbean Oceania 
 Definition of "Reasonable Accommodation"
 43%50%
75%
 90% 100%
 Facilitate Access by PWD to Assistive Technology
 43% 50%81%
 45% 100%

Categorically, there are many challenges needed to be accomplished first, in order to achieve full financial inclusion. The CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report’s results, in this respect, could be incorporated as best practices, when drafting and designing policy process. A definition in the constitution of "Reasonable Accommodation” for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and regulations enacted to facilitate access by PWD to assistive technologies at affordable cost will have a positive effect on better implementation of accessible public electronic kiosks or ATMs.

The CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report is a resource for advocates and policy makers to bencmark progress in making ICTs accessible in compliance with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities - 3rd Edition. The report was developed by G3ict in cooperation with Disabled People's International. View Report.

*******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Related Resource

Survey: G3ict Global Survey on Accessibility of Financial Services of Banks and Financial Institutions | View Project Details.  

Guide: Electronic Kiosks: Aiding Accessibility in Financial Services for Persons with Disabilities | Read More.

back


Related Items:

• Project Crystal

• BENCHMARKING DIGITAL ACCESSIBILITY

• UNICEF: Inclusive Education for Children with Disabilities can Transform Lives

• Innovative Computing Technology Aims to Boost Independence for PWDs

• NNDR 2013 - Conference on Disability Research, Turku, Finland


Comments
No records were found.
Post new comment:
Only register users can add comments please Log-in