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Publications & Reports

CRPD Implementation: Promoting Global Digital Inclusion through ICT Procurement Policies & Accessibility Standards



Stakeholders in the global disability movement view public procurement as an important tool for digital inclusion and implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

In response to this need, G3ict has begun an effort to convene diverse stakeholders from civil society, government, standards bodies, and industry to understand more clearly the impact of inclusive ICT procurement and to explore strategies to support broader adoption globally of these policies and related accessibility standards.
 
Through a series of international roundtable discussions and expert interviews in June of 2015, G3ict explored success stories, challenges to address, need for capacity and knowledge, and insights into the building blocks that can pave the way for inclusive public procurement and accessible ICT standards around the world. This white paper brings together the insights gained through these discussions. The G3ict Policy White Paper Series researches innovative policies and documents programs and good practices promoting ICT accessibility solutions among States Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and International Organizations.
 
A Policy White Paper Series Published by G3ict in October 2015.
 
» View related event - IAAP Access 2015 Conference (October 21-23), Henderson, Nevada

GAATES Toolkit: Key Indicators of Accessibility - Reporting on the UN CRPD



“This report was initiated and funded by The Delta Centre at the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs”. The objective of the report was to develop a toolkit that identifies key indicators on Universal Design and Accessibility in a national and international context. Published by GAATES in June 2015.

The toolkit serves to inform States Parties and is a model for signatories to the UNCRPD. Additionally, it fosters a higher level of understanding of accessibility and universal design around the world. The toolkit identifies a set of indicators that may be relevant when the signatories compile their reports to the UN on development in the area of universal design, in accordance with their obligations to UNCRPD, especially Article 9 on Accessibility. It provides an overview of accessibility/universal design indicators and measures that have been reported on by signatories to the CRPD.

Internet of Things: New Promises for Persons with Disabilities



Recent developments in both networks and devices are enabling a much greater range of connected devices and Internet of Things (IoT) functionalities. This paper explores the impact of the IoT on persons with disabilities. A G3ict Business Case White Paper Series researched in cooperation with AT&T | Published in July 2015. Accessible PDF provided by BarrierBreak.

The Internet of Things opens new opportunities for persons with disabilities and seniors, giving them an unprecedented control on their environment. Home automation already provides tools for more independent living, and new applications appear on the market for health care, transportation, education and employment. In the years to come, standardization, security and privacy will have to be addressed by industry, government and users.

» Order a hard copy

» Press Release

» Available in Russian (download PDF, 700 KB)
 

 

The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive



People living with disabilities in low-income countries are the world's poorest people. Of the billlion people with disabilities worldwide, 80% are in developing countries and within those countries, they are generally among the poorest and most excluded. But until recently, women, men, girls and boys with disabilities have remained largely on the margins of global development actions. Published by CBM UK | April 2015.

In 'The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive', CBM shares its experiences of implementing disabillity-inclusive development and what has been learned from them. The publication is the first of a series on disability-inclusive development, aimed at people working in the development and disability sector, professionals, partners and policy-makers, as well as anyone interested in the work of CBM and disability-inclusive development.

Third Party Captioning and Copyright: G3ict Policy White Paper



The past 70 years have brought a renaissance in the delivery of video programming. Accordingly, the need for third-party captioning has grown exponentially. Third parties are increasingly interested in adding captions to video programming to which they don’t hold the copyright. However, they also face potential liability for infringing the copyright of video creators. A G3ict Policy White Paper | Author: Blake E. Reid | Published March 2014, under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

This paper aims to take stock of this critical moment for captioning. It begins with an overview of closed captioning laws and regulations. It then turns to the potential legal conflicts between captioning and copyright law. It considers potential drivers behind the conflict, closing with an analysis of potential solutions including contracts, fair use, and legislation.
 

Zero Project Report 2014: International Study on the Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



Our mission is working for a world with zero barriers. Worldwide, the Zero Project finds and shares models that improve the daily lives and legal rights of all persons with disabilities. The focus of the year 2014 is accessibility.

The 20 indicators from the 'Convention Questionnaire' measure the implementation of some of the most important rights (articles) of the UN CRPD. Analyse the answers of experts in currently 132 countries, shown on world maps.
 
Also see: CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - researched by G3ict and DPI | Download Report.

Study on Assessing and Promoting e-Accessibility



This report presents the results and conclusions from a study on assessing and promoting e‐accessibility that was conducted on behalf of the European Commission. This report was prepared for the European Commission DG Communications Networks, Contents and Technology, 2013

The main aims of the study were to take stock of the extent of e‐accessibility across the EU27 countries and some key third countries, as well as the policy efforts that have emerged in this area. The focus was on e‐accessibility in three key domains – the World Wide Web, telecoms and television.
 
Also see: Putting e-Accessibility at the Core of Information Systems (G3ict Business Case White Paper Series) | Download PDF.

Towards an Inclusive and Accessible Future for All



Persons with disabilities have a significant positive impact on society, and their contributions can be even greater if we remove barriers to their participation. With more than one billion persons with disabilities in our world today, this is more important than ever. Published by United Nations Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 2013

While data on disability remain a challenge, there is compelling evidence of the barriers that persons with disabilities face in achieving economic and social inclusion. As the 2015 deadline for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the global community is discussing a new development framework that will build on the progress catalysed by the Millennium Declaration.

The ICT Opportunity for a Disability-Inclusive Development Framework



Synthesis report of the ICT Consultation in support of the High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development of the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly | September 2013

In today’s world, with the ubiquitous impact of ICTs across all sectors of activities in all countries, no one should be excluded from using mobile phones, the Internet, televisions, computers, electronic kiosks and their myriad of applications and services including in education, political life, and cultural activities or for e-government or e-health. The ICT Opportunity for a Disability-Inclusive Development Framework contributes to a better understanding of the extent to which information and communication technologies (ICTs) enable and accelerate the social and economic inclusion of persons with disabilities. It highlights that when ICTs are available, affordable and accessible, they significantly improve access to all aspects of society and development.

UN Broadband Commission Report: The State of Broadband 2013: Universalizing Broadband



Mobile broadband is the fastest growing technology in human history, according to the 2013 edition of the State of Broadband report. Published by the UN Broadband Commission, September 2013

Released in New York at the 8th meeting of the Broadband Commission for Digital Development, the report reveals that mobile broadband subscriptions, which allow users to access the web via smartphones, tablets and WiFi-connected laptops, are growing at a rate of 30% per year. By the end of 2013 there will be more than three times as many mobile broadband connections as there are conventional fixed broadband subscriptions.

Human Rights Watch Report: Barriers Everywhere: Accessibility for People with Disabilities in Russia



This report highlights obstacles such as the inability of people with physical disabilities to leave their homes due to lack of ramps and elevators, employers’ unwillingness to hire people with disabilities, and inadequate visual and auditory announcements on buses for people with sensory disabilities. Human Rights Watch urges Russia to make meaningful reforms to transportation, housing, and workplaces, among other facets of society | Published by Human Rights Watch, September 2013

Russia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2012 and will host the Winter Paralympics in March 2014. Despite these high profile steps the government has taken to demonstrate its commitment to accessibility, people living with disabilities in Russia face challenges carrying out basic daily tasks, including going to work or to school, visiting the doctor, shopping for groceries or medicine, attending cultural events, or socializing with friends.

Putting e-Accessibility at the Core of Information Systems



This white paper follows discussions from the 6th European e-Accessibility Forum organized by the Association BrailleNet and Universcience in Paris, France, on March 26, 2012. This is a Business Case White Paper Series published by G3ict in March 2013.

This G3ict White Paper presents and discusses
• The notion that e-accessibility must no longer be approached as an afterthought but rather as a core component of information systems with the potential to increase business and performance;
• The importance of widely recognized standards and technical guidance;
• The need for industry leaders to rise to the challenge and provide all stakeholders, from designers to end users, with the necessary tools and training to make e-accessibility feasible in large organizations;
• The means to design, build and distribute accessible products and services; and
• The importance of implementing accessibility in the day-to-day activities of digital content and service providers.
 
Available in Russian: Download PDF.  
 

BBC Media Action: Health on the Move - Can Mobile Phones Save Lives?



This policy briefing draws on BBC Media Action’s direct experience in using mobile phones to improve health education in one of the poorest states of India. Published by BBC Media Action, February 2013

This policy briefing focuses on how one of the greatest engines of innovation in the 21st century – the mobile phone – offers important opportunities for saving lives. The explosive growth of mobile telephony over the past decade has generated exciting new thinking around its potential to improve the uptake of health services and healthy behaviours. That potential is increasingly being
transformed into practice, with encouraging results.

Microsoft Web Accessibility Handbook



This Handbook from Microsoft and HiSoftware is a result of the European Dialogues on Web Accessibility. It combines practical strategies with some of the perspectives, goals, and vision that came out of those Dialogues. Published by Microsoft and HiSoftware, 2009

Throughout 2008, Microsoft gathered government officials, industry leaders, and non-governmental organization (NGO) representatives across several European countries as part of a series of interactive dialogues on the current state of Web accessibility. The objective of the Dialogues was to explore how critical players in both public organizations and private industry can work together on solutions that create a more accessible World Wide Web. The Dialogues featured robust conversation that both framed the challenges faced by proponents of Web accessibility and illuminated various solutions that organizations are using to realize the shared goal of an accessible Web environment.

United Nations Resource: Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in all Aspects of Development Efforts



The concept of mainstreaming disability in development is broadly defined as the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development efforts. The concept of inclusive development is enshrined in article 32 of the CRPD—the first stand-alone provision on international cooperation in a core human rights treaty | Published by the United Nations, November 2011

This document is divided into four main sections. Following a brief introduction, section II will focus on the initial criteria for the assessment of best practices. Section III presents a number of recommendations, suggesting also how the United Nations can facilitate the process of mainstreaming disability and persons with disabilities in development and highlighting the interlinkages between the mainstreaming of disability and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and section IV contains 26 case studies from across the globe.

iPads for Communication, Access, Literacy and Learning (iCALL)



Mobile devices such iPads, iPods and iPhones have taken the world by storm and are increasingly used in teaching and learning, and/or in therapy, to support learners with additional support needs, as well as for personal use. Published by CALL Scotland, The University of Edinburgh | September 2012

The primary aim of the Guide is to offer support to readers who are not necessarily technical specialists and who want to use the iPad with children or adults with some kind of additional support needs, special educational needs or disability.
 
The book includes chapters on:
  • Getting to grips with the iPad
  • Apps to support teaching & learning
  • Accessibility Options
  • iPad Accessories
  • iPad Resources
  • iPad in Assessments and Exams
  • Managing & Implementing the iPad
  • Glossary of Terms
  • iPad Management using iTunes: some useful tips

Visit the publication page on CallScotland.org for recent updates

Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Accessibility of Public Sector Bodies' Websites



This explanatory memorandum presents in further detail the proposal for a new Directive aiming at the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of the Member States on the accessibility of websites from public sector bodies | Published by the European Commission on December 3, 2012

Web-accessibility refers to principles and techniques to be obeserved when constructing websites, in order to render the content of these websites accessible to all users, in particular those with disabilities. Web-accessibility is of great importance for public sector bodies, to extend their reach and to fulfil their public responsibilities. Harmonization will lead to better market conditions, more jobs, cheaper web-accessibility and more accessible websites: a triple win for governments, businesses, and citizens.

Web Accessibility for Better Business Results (Innovation Series White Paper)



From both a business and a disability rights perspective, this paper describes the value for organizations of adopting techniques to produce accessible web content compliant with global standards. Published by G3ict | March 2012

Web accessibility is a precondition for all persons with disabilities to enjoy the use of the Internet and of websites. Without it, website producers may involuntarily exclude millions of users from their potential audience. This has been difficult to achieve to date due to the complexity of regulations coupled with the cost of training web authors to apply those rules consistently.
 
This G3ict Innovation White Paper is dedicated to presenting the benefits of web accessibility for businesses, and how the accessibility module of EditLive! produced by Ephox Corporation (www.ephox.com) can significantly help streamline the editing of accessible web pages.
 
 

 

Benefits and Costs of e-Accessibility (Business Case White Paper)



This white paper seeks to document the discussions that took place at the 5th European e-Accessibility Forum (March 2011) organized by BrailleNet in Paris. It can be considered to be a first step toward defining new analytical approaches to improve our understanding of how to best promote sustainable e-accessibility models. Published by G3ict | March 2012

The key conclusions of this white paper are the following:
• E-accessibility costs are highly dependent on the structure of the market and of supporting e-accessibility business ecosystems.
• Cost-benefit analysis can be applied to e-accessibility to demonstrate its socioeconomic benefits as well as to document the costs incurred by the lack of e-accessibility.
• Litigation influences the e-accessibility economy and can have a bearing on the costs involved.
• Standards can help incorporate e-accessibility widely in business and industrial practices so that products are accessible to everyone.
• Standards create a level playing field so that accessible products and services can compete effectively.
 

Accessibility of Government Websites in India



This report summarizes the key findings of a test conducted to measure the accessibility of 7800 websites of the Government of India and its affiliated agencies against the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, which is the universally accepted standard for web accessibility. It uses a combination of automated and manual testing to derive key findings.

Website inaccessibility is the largest and most common barrier to implementing effective e-governance. In a country like India, where a very large percentage of the population is disabled, elderly, illiterate, rural, having limited bandwidth, speaks only a vernacular language or uses alternative platforms like mobile phones, having accessible websites becomes all the more important to ensure that government information and services which are available online are accessible and usable by these groups.

Accelerating Development Using the Web: Empowering Poor and Marginalized Populations



This book explores the fundamental factors that are shaping the use of the Web for social and economic development. It describes the contributors that shape how the Internet grows, and how the Web can be made available to and effective for those billions in need. It addresses issues currently restricting access to the Web — political, technological, economic, cultural and linguistic — and suggests what mechanisms can be brought to bear to accelerate its utilization for poor and under-served populations.

This is a book about both ICTs and the World Wide Web. While the Web is one application of many existing on top of the Internet, it is the application that provides the principal window through which users increasingly access ICTs and which is evolving to permeate many aspects of daily life. It therefore deserves significant attention for its potential in making further significant contributions to assisting poor and underserved individuals and communities throughout the world.
 
Also read: Web Accessibility Policy Making: An International Perspective (3rd Edition, 2012). Download report.

National Council on Disability: Progress Report 2011



This annual progress report by the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes the current state of people with disabilities in America. Findings are based on information gathered through a variety of events with NCD stakeholders; the most recent figures from an extensive set of national data indicators measuring the quality of life of people with disabilities in the United States; and recent studies and reports from NCD | National Council on Disability, October 2011

This report contains many recommendations for improving the quality of life of people with disabilities. Given that the comprehensive reform of our nation‘s approach to disability policy will be a long-term process, immediate priority should be given to the recommendations that will lead to better education outcomes and increased employment and independent living opportunities for people with disabilities.
 
Also see: The Accessibility Imperative: Challenges and Opportunities of Implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Download report for free.

PEW Report: Americans Living with Disability and their Technology Profile



Using the internet can be a challenge for people living with disabilities. Two percent of American adults say they have a disability or illness that makes it harder or impossible for them to use the internet. The Pew Internet Project provides the following data as context for the continuing conversation about who does – and does not – use the internet in the U.S., including a proposal to extend the enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act to include websites operated by certain entities. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project | January 2011

Statistically speaking, disability is associated with being older, less educated, and living in a lower-income household. By contrast, internet use is statistically associated with being younger, college-educated, and living in a higher-income household. Thus, it is not surprising that people living with disability report lower rates of internet access than other adults. However, when all of these demographic factors are controlled, living with a disability in and of itself is negatively correlated with someone’s likelihood to have internet access.

Broadband Adoption and Use in America



Broadband Adoption and Use in America: OBI Working Paper Series No. 1. The Federal Communications Commission’s October-November 2009 survey finds that nearly two-thirds (65%) of American adults use high-speed Internet connections to go online from home.

The FCC conducted a survey of 5,005 Americans in October and November 2009 in an effort to understand the state of
broadband adoption and use, as well as barriers facing those who do not have broadband at home. Some 42% of Americans with disabilities have broadband at home. Broadband users overwhelmingly view the social aspects of the Internet as very important to them, while watching TV, videos or movies online and playing games were deemed less important.
 
Related event: G3ict Global Inquiry Kick-off Workshop: Broadband Adoption by Persons with Disabilities
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

A Comparative Test of Web Accessibility Evaluation Methods



After a quick review and description of methods, the paper illustrates a comparative test of two web accessibility evaluation methods: conformance testing and barrier walk through | Giorgio Brajnik, Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Udine | October 2008

Accessibility auditors have to choose a method when evaluating accessibility: expert review (a.k.a. conformance testing),
user testing, subjective evaluations, barrier walkthrough are some possibilities. The comparison in this study aims at determining merits of barrier walkthrough, using conformance testing as a control condition. A comparison framework is outlined, followed by the description of a laboratory experiment with 12 subjects (novice accessibility evaluators), and its results.

Accessible Publishing - Best Practice Guidelines for Publishers



The publishing landscape is becoming much more user-oriented; ensuring your published content is accessible by all your potential readers is more and more important. Providing “access” to content for people with print impairments is a challenge that all publishers can and should be tackling. The aim of this publication is to supply publishers with clear and concise guidance to assist them in these endeavors | April 2011

Making sure that your products are accessible makes good business sense, commercially, legally and ethically. With the right people, processes and practices in place you can increase the size of your market while at the same time enhancing your Corporate Social Responsibility profile at the same time. Our guidelines encourage publishers to make their mainstream publications as accessible as possible so that full access becomes the norm rather than being “special”.

ATHEN Report on the Accessibility of GMail and Google Calendar



The Access Technology Higher Education Network (ATHEN) is continuing its functional evaluation of the components of the Google Application Suite to determine the accessibility of each component for users with various types of disabilities and assistive technology.

This evaluation covers GMail and Google Calendar (Calendar). There are several positive findings for users with certain types of disabilities, including users of:
● screen magnification software
● keyboard-only interactions
● some high-contrast visual layouts
 
This report is the second in a series of reports on the accessibility of Google Apps. Its predecessor, the “ATHEN Report on the Accessibility of Google Documents”, is available at http://athenpro.org/google-docs-accessibility.
 
 

Business Case Study: Costs and Benefits of Implementation of Dutch Webrichtlijnen



The focus of the study is on the potential costs and benefits of implementation of the national Dutch Webrichtlijnen (internationally known as W3C WCAG). Authors: Eric Velleman and Thea van der Geest from the Center for e-Government Studies - Universiteit Twente | November 2011 | Dutch & English versions

In 2004, the Dutch government published an extensive set of guidelines for the development of high quality, maintainable and usable websites. In 2011, the updated version including WCAG2.0 became part of the ‘comply or explain’ list of Dutch Standards. Both versions fully include the accessibility criteria that W3C (the organization governing the Web) has published for accessible web content.

In commission of ECP-EPN, Platform for the Information Society, the University of Twente is conducting a study on the potential costs and benefits of implementation of the national Dutch Webrichtlijnen. The focus of the study is on non-governmental organizations, like businesses, corporations, not-for-profit, charity organizations and other private parties. What is the cost-benefit of (starting to) comply with the Webrichtlijnen (internationally known as W3C WCAG with some added guidelines) and what is the yield of the implementation of this national, governmental standard?

Caption Accuracy Metrics Project - Research into Automated Error Ranking of Real-time Captions in Live Television News Programs



Caption Accuracy Metrics Project report is produced by The Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media at WGBH (NCAM) | Authors: Tom Apone, Brad Botkin, Marcia Brooks and Larry Goldberg | September 2011

Real-time captioned news is a lifeline service for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, providing critical information about their local communities, national events and emergencies. The project scope was to: develop an industry standard approach to measuring caption quality, and use language-processing tools to create an automated caption accuracy assessment tool for real-time captions on live news programming.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – What Role for Philanthropy?



The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – what role for Philanthropy? is a paper presented by Professor Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre for Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2010 International Human Rights Funders Group conference held at San Francisco, California.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is anchored on the view that the person with the disability is not the problem.  Remember what Theresia Degener says – traditional disability law and policy ‘problematizes the person’. The problem resides in how third parties (including the State) reacts to disability. This is reflected in the definition of disability in Article 1 of the Convention: disability does not exist in the abstract. It is a function of how impairment is compounded by arbitrary barriers placed in front of people.

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Making Television Accessible



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives,  regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons  organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV. 

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - Polish version  
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

 

Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities: Recommendation or Mandatory Treaty?



The Information Society Project at Yale Law School Releases White Paper Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities

This Working Paper addresses the proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities. The authors conclude that if WIPO wants to achieve compliance, this proposed instrument should be binding hard law. Enacting this agreement as soft law would undermine the goal of making copyrighted works accessible to persons with print disabilities.
 
Authors: Margot Kaminski, Yale University - Yale Information Society Project; Yale University - Information Society Project; Yale University - Law School; Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, Yale Law School; ONO Academic College; Yale University - Information Society Project

Accessibility of Social Networking Services



Discapnet’s Observatory on ICT Accessibility has been carrying out sectoral studies on the accessibility of Web portals since 2004. This December 2010 report by Discapnet, Technosite and Fundacion ONCE, surveys present status of accessibility to social networking services for persons with disabilities.

Anybody with access to Internet and basic knowledge of how to use such tools is a potential user of social networking services. It is therefore a duty of the managers of such services to ensure accessibility, both to the services themselves and to the information they generate, under equal conditions for all users, including people with functional diversity.
 
The study on the Accessibility of Social Networking Services on Internet carried out by the Observatory offers a panorama of the current level of accessibility of the most widespread social networking services in Spain, with the aim of providing their managers with a diagnosis to help them improve accessibility, and their users with a breakdown of what each service has to offer.

Related Blog: Social Media and Accessibility by Debra Ruh. Read Here.

Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook



The goal of “Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator’s Handbook” is to provide guidance to cultural administrators on accessibility and inclusion for creating new or opening up existing programs to include individuals with disabilities and older adults, whether as staff, volunteers, program participants or audience members. Produced by: National Endowment of the Arts, National Endowment of the Humanities, National Assembly of State Art Agencies, and John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Since the disability rights movement rose to prominence in the 1970s, federal legislation has been passed, and disabled individuals are finally becoming part of the cultural mainstream. Great strides have been made, particularly in architectural and program access. Many Americans with disabilities now have the opportunity to create and participate fully in the arts and humanities. Much work, however, remains to be done.
 
“Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook” represents an update of the Arts Endowment's "The Arts and 504” (1992) with additional information from the 700-page “Design for Accessibility: An Arts Administrator’s Guide” produced by the Arts Endowment and NASAA in 1994. This resource is designed to help you not only comply with Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, but to assist you in making access an integral part of your organization’s planning, mission, programs, outreach, meetings, budget and staffing.

The Design of Human-Powered Access Technology



In this paper, the authors frame recent developments in human computation in the historical context of accessibility, and outline a framework for discussing new advances in human-powered access technology. Authors: Jeffrey P. Bigham, Richard E. Ladner and Yevgen Borodin.

People with disabilities have always overcome accessibility problems by enlisting people in their community to help. The Internet has broadened the available community and made it easier to get on-demand assistance remotely. In particular, the past few years have seen the development of technology in both research and industry that uses human power to overcome technical problems too difficult to solve automatically.
 
The paper presents a set of 13 design principles for humanpowered access technology motivated both by historical context and current technological developments. We then demonstrate the utility of these principles by using them to compare several existing human-powered access technologies. 

The Effectiveness of M-Health Technologies for Improving Health and Health Services: A Systematic Review



This systematic review will summarize the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-Health) around the world. Authors: Caroline Free, Gemma Phillips; Lambert Felix; Leandro Galli; Vikram Patel; Philip Edwards; BMC Research Notes

M-health, the use of mobile computing and communication technologies in health care and public health, is a rapidly expanding area of research and practice. M-health programmes and interventions use mobile electronic devices (MEDs), such as personal digital assistants and mobile phones, for a range of functions to support health behaviour change and chronic disease management by patients in the community.
 
This systematic review will provide recommendations on the use of mobile computing and communication technology in health care and public health and will guide future work on intervention development and primary research in this field.

Accessible Content: Best Practices Guide for Digital Environments



Video description should offer equivalent access to film, television and online content in multi-platform environments for people who are blind or have low vision. Publication by Analysis and Research in Communications, ARC and Media Access Canada.

The purpose of video description is to support and reflect the entertainment qualities of the content through description of the visual stimuli and style conveyed. 
 
Visual elements that are often overlooked by describers include title and end credits, subtitles and captions. Commercials and online content that stand alone or serve to support a program should also be described. Visual elements necessary to understand and enjoy the entertainment experience are described in this publication. 

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons With Disabilities (Russian Version)



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

UNIC Moscow (United Nations Information Centre - Moscow) has translated the English version of the kit to Russian. For more information on the translation initiative by UNIC Moscow visit: http://www.unic.ru/news_inf/viewer.php?uid=164

99 Tips for the Use of Mobile Phones for Students with Disabilities



The 99 tools from the magical pocket of Aki-chan: this research project provides tips on how mobile phones can offer strategies to engage students in learning in ways that best suit their needs.

“The 99 tools from the magical pocket of Aki-chan”: reading, writing, keeping and making notes, understanding time, planning activities, listening, calculating and using a dictionary, surfing the web, calling and messaging friends can all be undertaken on a mobile phone using tools from the ‘magical pocket".

The Magical Pocket of Aki-chan Project has been co-researched by the Research Centre of Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Tokyo and SoftBank Mobile Corp. The project name represents the mobile phone as a ‘magical pocket’ filled with tools ‒ each time you go into the pocket you can pull out a strategy that may help support the learning and participation in the classroom, of a student with disabilities. The aim of the project is to conduct research as well as raise awareness of the use of the mobile phone to support the independence of these students in their daily lives.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communities



This report explains what we have learned about the potential of geo-data for accessible travel. It also offers suggestions to interested stake holders about next steps toward the realization of this potential.

This report is a result of discussions that took place in July 2010 commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at the White House. Participants of the discussion were asked to focus on the challenge of more accessible travel, transportation, and tourism by applying geo-data.
 
User needs should form the basis of any initiative aimed at improving transportation information services for people with disabilities. In the field of assistive technologies, mobile devices, have emerged as a champion for accomodating user needs. Mobile technology has helped inform and empower citizens of all ages and abilities to accomplish safe and independent travel around our country.
 

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

"See it right" publication for Clear Print - RNIB



Guidelines for Editing for Low Vision Readers - Some guidance regarding styles for leaflet from the "See it right" publication for Clear Print from the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) - not a standard, but research-based.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, May 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this May 2008 issue focuses on The House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet hearing discussing the draft legislation "Enhancing Access to Broadband Technology and Services for Persons with Disabilities."

Web Accessibility at General Electric



Preety Kumar, Founder, President, and CEO of Deque Systems, Inc., discusses the significance of web accessibility and how General Electric recognized the necessity of accessible techniques in regards to making Web sites accessible to persons with disabilities.

Assessment of the Status of eAccessibility in Europe



This Executive Summary of Measuring Progress of eAccessibility in Europe (MeAC) is a report from a study commissioned by the European Commission in 2006 as a follow up to the eAccessibility Communication of 2005. The basic aim was the provide an evidence base to support the future deveopment of EU policy in the eAccessibility field.

Joint ANEC-EDF Position on eAccessibility



This joint ANEC/EDF position paper expresses views on the accessibility of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) products and services by consumers of all ages and abilities.

Web Accessibility in Context, an Investigation into Standardisation Issues



This study has set out to investigate the apparent gap between current published guidelines on accessibility and the current practice of web developers, and the tools used by the developers to create accessible websites.

An Avatar Based Approach for Automatic Interpretation of Text to Sign Language



Written by Mohamed Jemni and Oussama Elghoul, this paper describes a current project at the University of Tunis to develop, for the deaf community, a tool facilitating communication through the Web. The aim of this tool is to interpret automatically texts in visual-gestural-spatial language by using Avatar technology.


State of the eNation Accessibility Reports: Social Networking Web sites



Today many services are only available, or offered at a discounted rate on the Internet. Other Web sites provide vital information or functionality. If a Web site doesn't meet a base level of accessibility then it will be impossible for a large number of disabled visitors to use. Many others with some sort of limiting condition will also have great difficulty.

 

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) First Report on the Findings of the Survey of User Needs (SUN)



Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) first report on the findings of a new study aimed at surveying user needs vis-a-vis wireless technologies. The people surveyed represent a large portion of the 40 million Americans with disabilities.

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

IGDA Accessibility in Games: Motivations and Approaches



White paper from the International Game Developer's Association describing the necessity and steps to be taken in order to make gaming accessible to those with disabilities.

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.