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Publications & Reports

Tapping into Hidden Human Capital: How Leading Global Companies Improve their Bottom Line by Employing Persons with Disabilities

Tapping into Hidden Human Capital: How Leading Global Companies Improve their Bottom Line by Employing Persons with Disabilities
From large organizations with a global footprint to entrepreneurs with a few employees, attracting and retaining the right talent is the most critical success factor for their business. And as the pace of change, competitive pressures and turnover of critical human resources create new challenges every day, an untapped and often overlooked resource are employees with disabilities, whose skills, organizational commitment and positive impact on their work environment far outweigh the small costs, if any, of accommodating them. Published by G3ict, May 2016.
More Information:
 
Tapping into Hidden Human Capital: How Leading Global Companies Improve their Bottom Line by Employing Persons with Disabilities is an outstanding compendium of practical solutions for all employers by Debra Ruh, an entrepreneur with a wealth of experience in hiring persons with disabilities. It brings evidence of the benefits of employing persons with disabilities and shows step-by-step how to successfully do so.
 

Price:       19.95 USD
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United Nations ESCAP Report on Disability at a Glance 2015: Strengthening the Employment Prospects for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific



Disability at a Glance 2015 focuses on barriers to the employment of persons with disabilities in the Asia-Pacific region, and offers solutions to strengthen their employment prospects. Published by United Nations ESCAP in 2016.

Employment is not only the primary means of livelihood generation; it also provides individuals with the purpose and meaning of playing a productive role in society. Equal access to employment is therefore vital, and barriers to work faced by persons with disabilities must be removed. This fifth edition in the Disability at a Glance series offers a regional overview of disability legislation, policies and practices, as well as relevant country-specific information. The information draws on both a targeted disability survey carried out by the ESCAP secretariat, and research undertaken by other organizations and scholars.

GAATES Toolkit: Key Indicators of Accessibility - Reporting on the UN CRPD



“This report was initiated and funded by The Delta Centre at the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs”. The objective of the report was to develop a toolkit that identifies key indicators on Universal Design and Accessibility in a national and international context. Published by GAATES in June 2015.

The toolkit serves to inform States Parties and is a model for signatories to the UNCRPD. Additionally, it fosters a higher level of understanding of accessibility and universal design around the world. The toolkit identifies a set of indicators that may be relevant when the signatories compile their reports to the UN on development in the area of universal design, in accordance with their obligations to UNCRPD, especially Article 9 on Accessibility. It provides an overview of accessibility/universal design indicators and measures that have been reported on by signatories to the CRPD.

The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive



People living with disabilities in low-income countries are the world's poorest people. Of the billlion people with disabilities worldwide, 80% are in developing countries and within those countries, they are generally among the poorest and most excluded. But until recently, women, men, girls and boys with disabilities have remained largely on the margins of global development actions. Published by CBM UK | April 2015.

In 'The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive', CBM shares its experiences of implementing disabillity-inclusive development and what has been learned from them. The publication is the first of a series on disability-inclusive development, aimed at people working in the development and disability sector, professionals, partners and policy-makers, as well as anyone interested in the work of CBM and disability-inclusive development.

Enabling Access for Persons With Disabilities to Higher Education and Workplace: Role of ICT and Assistive Technologies



The enrollment percentages of children with disabilities into the primary and secondary education systems in India are extremely low. The challenges are many – the lack of accessible facilities, accessible lesson content, sensitive teachers who are competent to deal with their physical, intellectual and emotional needs, and inclusive assessment methodologies are top-of-the-line issues. These contribute to a huge drop out rate for the already minuscule percentage of children with disabilities who manage to get to school in the first place.

This journal is a voice from across the nation and outside, in three broad areas: ˜
  • Crucial difference between existing educational environments and inclusive/enabling ones;˜
  • Understanding what it means to ensure equal access, be sensitive to student needs, and redefine how we build educational environments;˜
  • How can Indian campuses become inclusive to be globally competent and competitive.

Zero Project Report 2014: International Study on the Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



Our mission is working for a world with zero barriers. Worldwide, the Zero Project finds and shares models that improve the daily lives and legal rights of all persons with disabilities. The focus of the year 2014 is accessibility.

The 20 indicators from the 'Convention Questionnaire' measure the implementation of some of the most important rights (articles) of the UN CRPD. Analyse the answers of experts in currently 132 countries, shown on world maps.
 
Also see: CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - researched by G3ict and DPI | Download Report.

Towards an Inclusive and Accessible Future for All



Persons with disabilities have a significant positive impact on society, and their contributions can be even greater if we remove barriers to their participation. With more than one billion persons with disabilities in our world today, this is more important than ever. Published by United Nations Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 2013

While data on disability remain a challenge, there is compelling evidence of the barriers that persons with disabilities face in achieving economic and social inclusion. As the 2015 deadline for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the global community is discussing a new development framework that will build on the progress catalysed by the Millennium Declaration.

Human Rights Watch Report: Barriers Everywhere: Accessibility for People with Disabilities in Russia



This report highlights obstacles such as the inability of people with physical disabilities to leave their homes due to lack of ramps and elevators, employers’ unwillingness to hire people with disabilities, and inadequate visual and auditory announcements on buses for people with sensory disabilities. Human Rights Watch urges Russia to make meaningful reforms to transportation, housing, and workplaces, among other facets of society | Published by Human Rights Watch, September 2013

Russia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2012 and will host the Winter Paralympics in March 2014. Despite these high profile steps the government has taken to demonstrate its commitment to accessibility, people living with disabilities in Russia face challenges carrying out basic daily tasks, including going to work or to school, visiting the doctor, shopping for groceries or medicine, attending cultural events, or socializing with friends.

Rethinking Disability in the Private Sector: Report from the Panel on Labor Market Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities



Most employers take seriously their responsibility to include people with disabilities in the workforce, and are eager to learn how they can do better. Published by the Government of Canada, 2013

In July 2012, the Government of Canada appointed a panel to consult with private sector employers, as well as other organizations and individuals, on the labor market participation of people with disabilities. The panel members were asked to identify successes and best practices in the employment of people with disabilities, as well as the barriers faced by employers, and to report on their findings. This report is directed at Canadian private sector employers.
 
Also see: Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities | A Global Survey of Policy Interventions and Good Practices by The Centre for Internet & Society, India and G3ict | Download PDF (opens as webpage)

Thematic Study on the Work and Employment of Persons with Disabilities



The present study focuses on the work and employment of persons with disabilities. It analyses relevant provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, highlights good practices in promoting employment opportunities for persons with disabilities, and identifies the main challenges that States parties encounter in ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy access to, retention of and advancement in employment on an equal basis with others | Annual report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Published December 2012

Article 27 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities sets out the right to work of persons with disabilities; it constitutes one of the most detailed provisions of the Convention, establishing the legal framework for State obligations in relation to work and employment of persons with disabilities. The right of persons with disabilities to work implies an obligation on the part of States parties to create an enabling and conducive environment for employment, in both the public and private sectors.
 

United Nations Resource: Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in all Aspects of Development Efforts



The concept of mainstreaming disability in development is broadly defined as the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development efforts. The concept of inclusive development is enshrined in article 32 of the CRPD—the first stand-alone provision on international cooperation in a core human rights treaty | Published by the United Nations, November 2011

This document is divided into four main sections. Following a brief introduction, section II will focus on the initial criteria for the assessment of best practices. Section III presents a number of recommendations, suggesting also how the United Nations can facilitate the process of mainstreaming disability and persons with disabilities in development and highlighting the interlinkages between the mainstreaming of disability and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and section IV contains 26 case studies from across the globe.

Employers Guide to Assistive Technology



Assistive Technology is a tool, not just for new employees with disabilities, but for all employees who wish to maximize their potential at work. This guide is prepared by Mada - Qatar Assistive Technology Center and Enable Ireland Assistive Technology Service Qatar | Edition November 2011

Assistive Technology encompasses everything from alternative ways of using computers to communication aids that use synthetic speech, power chairs operated by switch-controlled interfaces and environmental-control systems offering total remote control of lights, doors and windows. If disabled people are to find purposeful and meaningful employment, the need for Assistive Technology that facilitates entry into the workplace is huge. Your organization can hire a diverse workforce that includes people with disabilities.

GSDRC: Economic Benefits of Disability-Inclusive Development



A disability-inclusive approach to development seeks to include people with disability in the development process by "recognizing their potential, valuing and respecting their contributions and perspectives, honoring their dignity, and effectively responding to their needs" | Published by Governance and Social Development Resource Center | September 2012 | Author: Oliver Walton

The economic benefits of adopting a disability-inclusive approach to development are widely acknowledged in the literature as being significant. The literature also recognises, however, that these benefits are complex and difficult to quantify. This report provides an overview of the literature on the economic benefits of adopting a disability-inclusive approach to development. It also provides examples of good practice in the area of disability-inclusive development, with a particular focus on examples that demonstrate the economic benefits of adopting this approach.
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

National Council on Disability: Progress Report 2011



This annual progress report by the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes the current state of people with disabilities in America. Findings are based on information gathered through a variety of events with NCD stakeholders; the most recent figures from an extensive set of national data indicators measuring the quality of life of people with disabilities in the United States; and recent studies and reports from NCD | National Council on Disability, October 2011

This report contains many recommendations for improving the quality of life of people with disabilities. Given that the comprehensive reform of our nation‘s approach to disability policy will be a long-term process, immediate priority should be given to the recommendations that will lead to better education outcomes and increased employment and independent living opportunities for people with disabilities.
 
Also see: The Accessibility Imperative: Challenges and Opportunities of Implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Download report for free.

PEW Report: Americans Living with Disability and their Technology Profile



Using the internet can be a challenge for people living with disabilities. Two percent of American adults say they have a disability or illness that makes it harder or impossible for them to use the internet. The Pew Internet Project provides the following data as context for the continuing conversation about who does – and does not – use the internet in the U.S., including a proposal to extend the enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act to include websites operated by certain entities. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project | January 2011

Statistically speaking, disability is associated with being older, less educated, and living in a lower-income household. By contrast, internet use is statistically associated with being younger, college-educated, and living in a higher-income household. Thus, it is not surprising that people living with disability report lower rates of internet access than other adults. However, when all of these demographic factors are controlled, living with a disability in and of itself is negatively correlated with someone’s likelihood to have internet access.

The Global Economics of Disability



The intent of this paper is to inform those grappling with how to position disability as a new market segment, and speak to the market in an economic context | Fifth Quadrant Analytics and Return on Disability Company | March 2012

Making up 1.1 billion people globally, Persons with Disabilities represent a sizeable population. Unlocking the potential in this large subset of the global community has serious ramifications for GDP, public and private institutional cash flows and how economies grapple with an aging population. The familiar emerging market investing question must be asked: when does this market tip? When does the global platform of disability mirror the scope and revenue generating power of Green?

Framework for Designing and Implementing Accessible Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Strategic Plans



This paper provides a framework that can be used to develop technical assistance tools to help employers (including government contractors) design, purchase, lease, maintain and use ICT that is accessible to and usable by people with disabilities and others. US Office of Disability Employment Policy | February 2012

As technology continues to transform the workplace, demand is growing for the development, purchase, maintenance and use of information and communication technology (ICT) that is accessible to and usable by all applicants and employees, including individuals with disabilities. Leading companies recognize that fostering an accessible workplace is the smart thing to do, both from a business standpoint and a legal perspective. 
 
The paper also includes a comprehensive Benchmarking Tool, llocated in the Appendix, which companies could use to conduct a self-assessment and create their own corporate-wide, comprehensive strategic plan (affirmative action program, where applicable), including accountability mechanisms and methods for ensuring continuous improvement. This Benchmarking Tool is organized in accordance with the key components of an Accessible ICT Strategic Plan outlined herein.

ILO Report - Disability in the Workplace: Employers' Organizations and Business Networks



Employers’ organizations and business networks can play a major role in providing technical advice and services that help employers to hire, manage and retain employees with disabilities | ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities and Skills and Employability Department 2011

Disability in the Workplace: Employers’ Organizations and Business Networks provides insights into how representative organizations of business address the issue of disability. The practices described in these examples demonstrate how such organizations are well placed to link business interests and the productive integration of people with disabilities in the labour market. At a moment when countries are rapidly ratifying and seeking to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, a comprehensive human rights convention for people with disabilities, there are increasing needs to provide inspiration and guidance for businesses. Disability in the Workplace: Employers’ Organizations and Business Networks responds to an emerging body of information that supports the business case for hiring people with disabilities and the interest of companies to maintain diverse workforces.

ILO Report - Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices



Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices describes the contemporary experiences of 25 companies and their work on the issue of disability | ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities and Skills and Employability Department 2010

Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices is timely for many reasons. It comes in the wake of a major global economic crisis, yet the companies profiled have nevertheless given strength to their disability and diversity initiatives. It provides inspiration and guidance to companies at a time when countries are ratifying and seeking to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities ‐ a comprehensive human rights Convention for people with disabilities that will require some changes in national policies and practices related to work and employment. Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices also responds to an emerging body of information that supports the business case for hiring people with disabilities and the interest of companies to maintain diverse workforces.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – What Role for Philanthropy?



The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – what role for Philanthropy? is a paper presented by Professor Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre for Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2010 International Human Rights Funders Group conference held at San Francisco, California.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is anchored on the view that the person with the disability is not the problem.  Remember what Theresia Degener says – traditional disability law and policy ‘problematizes the person’. The problem resides in how third parties (including the State) reacts to disability. This is reflected in the definition of disability in Article 1 of the Convention: disability does not exist in the abstract. It is a function of how impairment is compounded by arbitrary barriers placed in front of people.

Enabling Access for Persons with Disabilities to Higher Education and Workplace: Role of ICT and Assistive Technologies



Enabling Access for Persons with Disabilities to Higher Education and Workplace: Role of ICT and Assistive Technologies is an editorial publication released on the conference of the same name in January 2012 in Bangalore, India. It compiles best practices, case studies and personal stories of overcoming barriers to inclusion in higher education and employment for persons with disabilities.

With the intent of generating awareness and creating an atmosphere of equal opportunity towards inclusivity at academic institutions and workplaces across India, this publication - released on the occasion of the Enabling Access conference - is an initiative in bringing the key stakeholders of industry, NGOs and educational institutes together on a platform where best practices and case studies can be discussed.
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Understanding Web Accessibility: A Guide to Create Accessible Work Environments



This handbook provides insights and tips on what a company needs to do for ICT accessibility and the potential benefits that thus accrue.

Web accessibility simply means that the web pages are usable by all and also on different devices. Web Accessibility Guidelines are popularly known as WCAG 2.0. The website www.w3.org/wai not only provides these guidelines, but also provides links to testing the websites and suggests changes that need to be made in order to make a website compliant to WCAG 2.0. Whenever, a new website or web-based user interface is created or updated, one must insist that the web developers make the site WCAG 2.0 compliant. Having this deliverable as part of the contract would help ensure execution of the task.
 
This publication is released by NASSCOM Foundation and has been made possible with the support of the Wadhwani Foundation.

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

The Design of Human-Powered Access Technology



In this paper, the authors frame recent developments in human computation in the historical context of accessibility, and outline a framework for discussing new advances in human-powered access technology. Authors: Jeffrey P. Bigham, Richard E. Ladner and Yevgen Borodin.

People with disabilities have always overcome accessibility problems by enlisting people in their community to help. The Internet has broadened the available community and made it easier to get on-demand assistance remotely. In particular, the past few years have seen the development of technology in both research and industry that uses human power to overcome technical problems too difficult to solve automatically.
 
The paper presents a set of 13 design principles for humanpowered access technology motivated both by historical context and current technological developments. We then demonstrate the utility of these principles by using them to compare several existing human-powered access technologies. 

Strategies for Funding the Human Rights of People with Disabilities



Funders could employ many different strategies and approaches to advance the human rights of people with disabilities. After extensive field consultations, several overarching recommendations for disability grantmaking are outlined in this report.

The disability funding field remains open and relatively untainted by common grantmaking pitfalls. As the field grows, it is important for funders to continue to support the active participation of PWDs at all levels of activity, and to nurture collaboration and collective learning experiences. The recommendations in this report summarize the learning of current funders as well as the advice of the grantseekers themselves.

Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion



Through the Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion initiative, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies | September 2011

While businesses sometimes encounter serious challenges as they seek to implement inclusion strategies, many employers have overcome these hurdles with robust and creative practices. Through the Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion initiative, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies. This publication highlights successful strategies that can be used by businesses of all sizes to create a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and supply chain. Real-life examples, such as these, are important to help businesses realize the wide range of opportunities available and the potential for replicating success.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons With Disabilities (Russian Version)



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

UNIC Moscow (United Nations Information Centre - Moscow) has translated the English version of the kit to Russian. For more information on the translation initiative by UNIC Moscow visit: http://www.unic.ru/news_inf/viewer.php?uid=164

The Role of High-Speed Broadband in Telecommunications Between People with Limited Speech and the Health Workforce



Report for the Institute for a Broadband-Enabled Society, University of Melbourne, Australia, detailing the role of high speed broadband in communication between people with little or no speech and GPs. Year: 2010/2011

In April 2009, the federal government announced that it will be launching a National Broadband Network, with Internet speeds up to 100 times faster than current speeds in Australia. Evidence has shown that internet-based solutions enable people with communication impairments to make themselves heard and to interact with others.

This research sought to address the communication needs of people with little or no speech in healthcare, and began to explore the potential role of high-speed broadband in facilitating communication between GPs and patients with communication difficulties. 

The Clear Print Standard: Arguments for a Flexible Approach



This report makes recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version of the Clear Print guidelines published by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) for adoption within the public sector.

As well as Large Print for people with impaired vision, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) also publishes Clear Print guidelines for general use. These have been widely adopted in the public sector. In these notes we take a critical look at what they say about type size, and the evidence on which the standard is based. We support the idea of a minimum type size for normal text, but question the inflexibility which inhibits some organisations from using even slightly smaller sizes for diagrams and tables – features that can make information clearer. We make recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Accessibility, Innovation and Sustainability at AT&T



A G3ict White Paper Documenting How Mobile Service Providers Can Serve Persons with Disabilities and Seniors

In order to promote the business practices required to provide accessible and assistive mobile equipment and services to persons with disabilities, G3ict requested that AT&T opens its doors to review and document its internal R&D and business processes for the benefit all interested parties. Read more.

 

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

Technology for Employability in Latin America: Research with At‐risk Youth & People with Disabilities



Compiled by the Center for Information & Society at the University of Washington.

This study examines the recent investment into computer centers providing basic technology training for people with disabilities and at‐risk youth in five Latin American countries: Brazil, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, and Venezuela. The authors discuss the ways in which technology training impacts the employability concerns of two populations with diverse needs and histories of social and economic exclusion from formal labor markets. Read Dr. Joyojeet Pal's review.
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

A Case Study of One of the Most Successful Programs Designed by a Higher Education Institution to Promote Employability among Students Living with Disability



Written by Professor Licia Sbattella, President's Delegate for Disabilities at Politecnico di Milano, Italy, this case study will be presented at the 4th Shafallah International Forum on Children with Special Needs: Achieving Independence, Doha, Qatar, April 20-22.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) First Report on the Findings of the Survey of User Needs (SUN)



Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) first report on the findings of a new study aimed at surveying user needs vis-a-vis wireless technologies. The people surveyed represent a large portion of the 40 million Americans with disabilities.

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.