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Publications & Reports

GAATES Toolkit: Key Indicators of Accessibility - Reporting on the UN CRPD



“This report was initiated and funded by The Delta Centre at the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs”. The objective of the report was to develop a toolkit that identifies key indicators on Universal Design and Accessibility in a national and international context. Published by GAATES in June 2015.

The toolkit serves to inform States Parties and is a model for signatories to the UNCRPD. Additionally, it fosters a higher level of understanding of accessibility and universal design around the world. The toolkit identifies a set of indicators that may be relevant when the signatories compile their reports to the UN on development in the area of universal design, in accordance with their obligations to UNCRPD, especially Article 9 on Accessibility. It provides an overview of accessibility/universal design indicators and measures that have been reported on by signatories to the CRPD.

The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive



People living with disabilities in low-income countries are the world's poorest people. Of the billlion people with disabilities worldwide, 80% are in developing countries and within those countries, they are generally among the poorest and most excluded. But until recently, women, men, girls and boys with disabilities have remained largely on the margins of global development actions. Published by CBM UK | April 2015.

In 'The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive', CBM shares its experiences of implementing disabillity-inclusive development and what has been learned from them. The publication is the first of a series on disability-inclusive development, aimed at people working in the development and disability sector, professionals, partners and policy-makers, as well as anyone interested in the work of CBM and disability-inclusive development.

Zero Project Report 2014: International Study on the Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



Our mission is working for a world with zero barriers. Worldwide, the Zero Project finds and shares models that improve the daily lives and legal rights of all persons with disabilities. The focus of the year 2014 is accessibility.

The 20 indicators from the 'Convention Questionnaire' measure the implementation of some of the most important rights (articles) of the UN CRPD. Analyse the answers of experts in currently 132 countries, shown on world maps.
 
Also see: CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - researched by G3ict and DPI | Download Report.

Towards an Inclusive and Accessible Future for All



Persons with disabilities have a significant positive impact on society, and their contributions can be even greater if we remove barriers to their participation. With more than one billion persons with disabilities in our world today, this is more important than ever. Published by United Nations Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 2013

While data on disability remain a challenge, there is compelling evidence of the barriers that persons with disabilities face in achieving economic and social inclusion. As the 2015 deadline for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the global community is discussing a new development framework that will build on the progress catalysed by the Millennium Declaration.

Human Rights Watch Report: Barriers Everywhere: Accessibility for People with Disabilities in Russia



This report highlights obstacles such as the inability of people with physical disabilities to leave their homes due to lack of ramps and elevators, employers’ unwillingness to hire people with disabilities, and inadequate visual and auditory announcements on buses for people with sensory disabilities. Human Rights Watch urges Russia to make meaningful reforms to transportation, housing, and workplaces, among other facets of society | Published by Human Rights Watch, September 2013

Russia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2012 and will host the Winter Paralympics in March 2014. Despite these high profile steps the government has taken to demonstrate its commitment to accessibility, people living with disabilities in Russia face challenges carrying out basic daily tasks, including going to work or to school, visiting the doctor, shopping for groceries or medicine, attending cultural events, or socializing with friends.

UNICEF The State of the World's Children 2013: Children with Disabilities



Given opportunities to flourish as others might, children with disabilities have the potential to lead fulfilling lives and to contribute to the social, cultural and economic vitality of their communities – as the personal essays in this volume attest. Published by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) May 2013

Under the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), governments around the world have taken upon themselves the responsibility of ensuring that all children, irrespective of ability or disability, enjoy their rights without discrimination of any kind.

The PASSAGE Project: Making European Rail Travel Accessible for All



A passenger with a disability or reduced mobility (PRM) is entitled to access trains and stations under the same conditions as other passengers, unless the design of the train or station makes the access physically impossible. Report prepared by Dirk Oelschlager and David Sindall and presented at TRANSED 2012, New Delhi, India

The European Commission is making accessibility an essential requirement for rail infrastructure when newly built, upgraded or renewed. Accessibility can be achieved by preventing or removing barriers and through other measures such as provision of assistance. The rules apply to infrastructure (e.g. obstacle-free routes, ticketing, information desks, toilets, visual and spoken information, platform width and height, and boarding aids) and to rail carriages (e.g. doors, toilets, wheelchair spaces, and information).

United Nations Resource: Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in all Aspects of Development Efforts



The concept of mainstreaming disability in development is broadly defined as the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development efforts. The concept of inclusive development is enshrined in article 32 of the CRPD—the first stand-alone provision on international cooperation in a core human rights treaty | Published by the United Nations, November 2011

This document is divided into four main sections. Following a brief introduction, section II will focus on the initial criteria for the assessment of best practices. Section III presents a number of recommendations, suggesting also how the United Nations can facilitate the process of mainstreaming disability and persons with disabilities in development and highlighting the interlinkages between the mainstreaming of disability and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and section IV contains 26 case studies from across the globe.

Better Design and Buildings for Everyone: Disabled People’s Rights and the Built Environment



The ability to move through the world independently and safely allows disabled people access to and the ability to participate in communities, education, health services, recreation, and make social connections. Access to the built environment is therefore a fundamental human right | Published by New Zealand's Human Rights Commission October 2012

This report covers buildings in particular and looks at:
1. the Commission’s experience in accessibility issues relating to the built environment
2. the relevant international standards and domestic legislation
3. overseas approaches to the issue
4. ideas to improve accessibility in the future.

Assistive Technology as a Means of Supporting People with Dementia: A Review



This paper reviews the current policy and practice in relation to Assistive Technology supporting people to live well with dementia, including different housing settings and rounding off with some good practice case studies which highlight the wide array of technology solutions available | Written for the U.K.'s Housing Learning & Improvement Network by Steve Bonner and Tahir Idris, Assistive Technology consultants | Published July 2012

Included in this thorough review are:
- Definitions and a brief summary of different types of AT
- A review of policy initiatives, including legislation, which have
attempted to encourage the greater use of AT
- Ethical considerations
- Current practice by major housing providers
- Good practice examples
- People with dementia’s experience
- Further reading links

Paratransit for Mobility-Impaired Persons in Developing Regions: Starting Up and Scaling Up



It is about addressing the need of persons with disabilities and others for paratransit service when accessible “fixed-route” bus or rail service is not available or, if available, cannot be used by persons who need more specialized transportation. Published by Access Exchange International, San Francisco | September 2012

This guide is written for city officials, transit operators, entrepreneurs, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), social service agencies, and others who may wish to start up or expand door-to-door paratransit services to help mobility-impaired persons to get to where they need to go. this guide provides information and guidance for cities and towns and villages in less-wealthy regions faced with many barriers to such transportation. These barriers are so great that many cities, to say nothing of the countryside beyond these cities, have not begun to address the task of providing paratransit for those who most need it.

National Council on Disability: Progress Report 2011



This annual progress report by the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes the current state of people with disabilities in America. Findings are based on information gathered through a variety of events with NCD stakeholders; the most recent figures from an extensive set of national data indicators measuring the quality of life of people with disabilities in the United States; and recent studies and reports from NCD | National Council on Disability, October 2011

This report contains many recommendations for improving the quality of life of people with disabilities. Given that the comprehensive reform of our nation‘s approach to disability policy will be a long-term process, immediate priority should be given to the recommendations that will lead to better education outcomes and increased employment and independent living opportunities for people with disabilities.
 
Also see: The Accessibility Imperative: Challenges and Opportunities of Implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Download report for free.

PEW Report: Americans Living with Disability and their Technology Profile



Using the internet can be a challenge for people living with disabilities. Two percent of American adults say they have a disability or illness that makes it harder or impossible for them to use the internet. The Pew Internet Project provides the following data as context for the continuing conversation about who does – and does not – use the internet in the U.S., including a proposal to extend the enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act to include websites operated by certain entities. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project | January 2011

Statistically speaking, disability is associated with being older, less educated, and living in a lower-income household. By contrast, internet use is statistically associated with being younger, college-educated, and living in a higher-income household. Thus, it is not surprising that people living with disability report lower rates of internet access than other adults. However, when all of these demographic factors are controlled, living with a disability in and of itself is negatively correlated with someone’s likelihood to have internet access.

Socioeconomic Impacts of Wireless Technology



The purpose of this report is to assess socioeconomic opportunities and challenges that arise from existing and emerging uses of wireless (licensed spectrum) technology, with a particular focus on the areas of health, finance, education, and empowerment. The report was commissioned by CTIA—The Wireless Association® and prepared by BSR | May 2012

The effect of wireless technology on modern society has been profound. Wireless mobility enables instant communication anywhere, anytime, mobilizing the rapid transfer of information and services over immense distances, unbound by geographic barriers. New ways to connect, share, and innovate using wireless technology are invented every day around the world, and are shattering traditional walls that have divided societies for centuries. In this report, we examine the social effects through four lenses: Health Care, Finance, Education, and Community Empowerment.

The Global Economics of Disability



The intent of this paper is to inform those grappling with how to position disability as a new market segment, and speak to the market in an economic context | Fifth Quadrant Analytics and Return on Disability Company | March 2012

Making up 1.1 billion people globally, Persons with Disabilities represent a sizeable population. Unlocking the potential in this large subset of the global community has serious ramifications for GDP, public and private institutional cash flows and how economies grapple with an aging population. The familiar emerging market investing question must be asked: when does this market tip? When does the global platform of disability mirror the scope and revenue generating power of Green?

Forced Migration Review Issue 35: Disability and Displacement



The feature theme articles in this issue of FMR show why disabled people who are displaced need particular consideration, and highlight some of the initiatives taken (locally and at the global level) to change thinking and practices so that their vulnerability is recognized, their voices heard – and responses made inclusive | University of Oxford, Refugee Studies Centre | July 2010

An oft-quoted statistic is the World Health Organisation’s estimate that persons with disabilities account for 7-10% of the world’s population. This would imply that there are three to four million persons living with disability among the world’s 42 million displaced. It is not (yet) common practice, however, to include people with disabilities among those who are considered as particularly vulnerable in disasters and displacement and who therefore require targeted response.

Doing Transport Differently: How to Access Public Transport



This guide is aimed at people with lived experience of disability or health conditions and at those advising or working with them. Using a question and answer approach to enable different people with different travel needs to dip into it in different ways, it will show you how far access to public transport has improved and how to make use of it | Radar - The Disability Rights People | March 2012

During the last two decades much of the public transport in the UK has become accessible to disabled people although there remains much to do. Despite this progress, the missing element is often that some disabled people have insufficient information about what is available and therefore lack the confidence to use it. This guide is an attempt to put that right. The information you need to get out and about is between the covers of this publication.

Freedom Guide: Paving the Way Towards Free Movement for Persons with Disabilities



This publication provides an overview of the implications of the rights recognized by the European Union Treaties linked to Free movement of persons, goods and services, for persons with disabilities. The Freedom Guide concretely aims to illustrate the fact that Freedom of movement is still not a reality for persons with disabilities. European Disability Forum | December 2011

Persons with disabilities often face accessibility barriers when they want to go to work, to attend school or, for example, go to vote. Such barriers also impede their full and equal participation in leisure, sports and cultural activities. In 2011, EDF launched a Top Campaign on the theme ‘Freedom of movement’, focusing on the Free Movement of persons, as well as goods and services within the European Union. This campaign aims at removing the main barriers to Freedom of movement that persons with disabilities daily face.

This publication uses data derived from a survey launched by EDF during the summer 2011. This survey intends to generate a clearer picture of the experiences for persons with disabilities in relation to Freedom of Movement. It was completed by individuals with disabilities and/or family members of persons with disabilities who need support to represent themselves.

Technological Innovations in Transportation for People with Disabilities



The report summarizes a workshop held on February 23, 2011 to examine technological innovations in accessible transportation and better understand the requirements of pedestrians and travelers with visual impairment or other disabilities | U.S. Department of Transportation | February 2011

To examine technological innovations in accessible transportation and better understand the requirements of pedestrians and travelers with visual impairment or other disabilities, the Federal Highway Administration’s Office of Research, Development, and Technology and, specifically, leaders from the Office of Operations Research and Development and the Exploratory Advanced Research Program, convened a 1-day workshop to explore this area. In February 2011, a panel of speakers made up of disability experts, academia professionals, transportation industry experts, and other professionals were brought together to discuss applications of technology, identify knowledge gaps and opportunities, and highlight barriers to implementation.

Through the distribution of this summary report to the workshop participants and the broader highway and disability communities, we aim to encourage further discussion regarding the development of technological applications for pedestrians and travelers with disabilities. These discussions could also lead to the identification of future research needs and opportunities to enhance the transportation accessibility for all Americans.

Caption Accuracy Metrics Project - Research into Automated Error Ranking of Real-time Captions in Live Television News Programs



Caption Accuracy Metrics Project report is produced by The Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media at WGBH (NCAM) | Authors: Tom Apone, Brad Botkin, Marcia Brooks and Larry Goldberg | September 2011

Real-time captioned news is a lifeline service for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, providing critical information about their local communities, national events and emergencies. The project scope was to: develop an industry standard approach to measuring caption quality, and use language-processing tools to create an automated caption accuracy assessment tool for real-time captions on live news programming.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – What Role for Philanthropy?



The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – what role for Philanthropy? is a paper presented by Professor Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre for Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2010 International Human Rights Funders Group conference held at San Francisco, California.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is anchored on the view that the person with the disability is not the problem.  Remember what Theresia Degener says – traditional disability law and policy ‘problematizes the person’. The problem resides in how third parties (including the State) reacts to disability. This is reflected in the definition of disability in Article 1 of the Convention: disability does not exist in the abstract. It is a function of how impairment is compounded by arbitrary barriers placed in front of people.

Travelling with Hearing Loss Research



Travelling with Hearing Loss, commissioned by the New Zealand National Foundation for the Deaf, aims to establish what people with hearing loss want in terms of tourism products and services, and to offer a better understanding of Access Tourism as a legitimate tourism market.

In 2011, the New Zealand National Foundation for the Deaf (NFD) commissioned the New Zealand Tourism Research Institute (NZTRI) to conduct research into the tourism, travel, and hospitality experiences and needs of people with hearing impairments.

Hearing impairment ranges from slight hearing loss to total loss. The research was led by Dr. Sandra Rhodda, Research Programme Leader in Access Tourism. The research included two surveys, one for residents of New Zealand and one for residents of countries other than New Zealand who are deaf or have hearing loss and who are 20 years old or older. The aim of the research was to find out what it is like to travel with hearing loss, and how the travel experiences of hearing impaired people can be improved.

 

Review of International Best Practices in Accessible Public Transportation for Persons with Disabilities



This United Nations Development Programme publication covers easy to long-term practices for improving access in transport. It discusses the elements of accessibility, road and pedestrian environments, vehicle design and operation, stops and stations, signage and information, and training and policies | Kementerian Pembangunan Wanita, Keluarga dan Masyarakat Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development

One of the articles of the Convention, which is also the subject of this report, is the core issue of accessibility. Article 9 of the Convention requires countries to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers and ensure that persons with disabilities can access their environment, transportation, public facilities and e-services, and information and communications technologies. More importantly, the Convention approaches issues of persons with disabilities from a rights-based approach. Hence, Article 9 also speaks about the importance of enabling persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully in all aspects of life, which will not be possible, if accessibility is not fully ensured.
 
This report provides an international overview of the key technical issues on accessible public transportation for persons with disabilities. It begins with a brief description of the prevalence of disability and factors that influence accessibility. It also explains why safe and convenient pedestrian infrastructure is particularly essential for persons with disabilities if they wish to satisfactorily access public transport.

A Community for All: Implementing Article 19



A Guide for Monitoring Progress on the Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This guide and checklist were developed as part of a project of the Mental Health Initiative and the Law and Health Initiative of the Open Society Public Health Program | Open Society Foundations, December 2012

The Community for All guide and checklist offers a detailed look at the rights identified in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), especially Article 19 of the CRPD which provides for the right to live independently and be included in the community. The guide and checklist are intended to help advocates and program implementers identify the obligations on States to realize these rights. Community for All promotes the right of all people with disabilities to live and participate in the community as equal citizens, particularly in countries in which people with disabilities continue to be segregated in institutions.

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities



Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society | Published by ITU - August 2012

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. At the end of 2011, there were more than 5.9 billion mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions. By the same point in 2013, we expect such subscriptions to outnumber the global population.

In the midst of this telecommunication revolution, however, populations of senior citizens and persons living with disabilities have been left out due to accessibility factors: complex human interfaces difficult to understand and activate for persons with cognitive impairments or learning disabilities, lack of alternative communications for persons living with low vision, blind, hard of hearing or deaf, or, quite often handset ergonomics too difficult for persons with physical disabilities such as dexterity or mobility limitations.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

Read the Press Release associated with this publication.

Oracle Accessibility Program for Customers



Oracle WSC Workshop on Accessibility and the Contributions of International Standards. Report by Luke Kowalski - Vice President, Corporate Architecture Group, Oracle, and Peter Wallack - Accessibility Program Director, Oracle

Accessibility is about making user interfaces perceivable, operable, and understandable by people with a wide range of abilities. Assistive, Access or Adaptive Technology are devices for people with disabilities that enable people to perform tasks that they were formerly unable to accomplish, or had great difficulty accomplishing, by providing enhancements to or changed methods of interacting with the technology needed to accomplish such tasks.
 
Oracle products are coded to standards, and are capable of providing comparable access to individuals with disabilities when they are used in accordance with Oracle's product documentation and provided that assistive technologies and other products used with them properly interoperate with our product. A timely report on the corporation's accessibility practices.

Orange & Accessibility: Facilitating Access to Communication Services for the Elderly and Disabled



Orange & Accessibility: Facilitating Access to Communication Services for the Elderly and Disabled. Report by François René Germain, VP France Telecom Group Accessibility

Orange and Accessibility: What has been accomplished? Orange develops accessibility and integrates it into all of its activities. It dialogues with institutions, associations and customers in order to identify the needs of disabled and older people with disabilities. The report, presented at the WSC workshop “Accessibility and the Contribution of International Standards" highlights Orange's accessibility program for its customers.

Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook



The goal of “Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator’s Handbook” is to provide guidance to cultural administrators on accessibility and inclusion for creating new or opening up existing programs to include individuals with disabilities and older adults, whether as staff, volunteers, program participants or audience members. Produced by: National Endowment of the Arts, National Endowment of the Humanities, National Assembly of State Art Agencies, and John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Since the disability rights movement rose to prominence in the 1970s, federal legislation has been passed, and disabled individuals are finally becoming part of the cultural mainstream. Great strides have been made, particularly in architectural and program access. Many Americans with disabilities now have the opportunity to create and participate fully in the arts and humanities. Much work, however, remains to be done.
 
“Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook” represents an update of the Arts Endowment's "The Arts and 504” (1992) with additional information from the 700-page “Design for Accessibility: An Arts Administrator’s Guide” produced by the Arts Endowment and NASAA in 1994. This resource is designed to help you not only comply with Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, but to assist you in making access an integral part of your organization’s planning, mission, programs, outreach, meetings, budget and staffing.

The Design of Human-Powered Access Technology



In this paper, the authors frame recent developments in human computation in the historical context of accessibility, and outline a framework for discussing new advances in human-powered access technology. Authors: Jeffrey P. Bigham, Richard E. Ladner and Yevgen Borodin.

People with disabilities have always overcome accessibility problems by enlisting people in their community to help. The Internet has broadened the available community and made it easier to get on-demand assistance remotely. In particular, the past few years have seen the development of technology in both research and industry that uses human power to overcome technical problems too difficult to solve automatically.
 
The paper presents a set of 13 design principles for humanpowered access technology motivated both by historical context and current technological developments. We then demonstrate the utility of these principles by using them to compare several existing human-powered access technologies. 

The Effectiveness of M-Health Technologies for Improving Health and Health Services: A Systematic Review



This systematic review will summarize the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-Health) around the world. Authors: Caroline Free, Gemma Phillips; Lambert Felix; Leandro Galli; Vikram Patel; Philip Edwards; BMC Research Notes

M-health, the use of mobile computing and communication technologies in health care and public health, is a rapidly expanding area of research and practice. M-health programmes and interventions use mobile electronic devices (MEDs), such as personal digital assistants and mobile phones, for a range of functions to support health behaviour change and chronic disease management by patients in the community.
 
This systematic review will provide recommendations on the use of mobile computing and communication technology in health care and public health and will guide future work on intervention development and primary research in this field.

Accessible Content: Best Practices Guide for Digital Environments



Video description should offer equivalent access to film, television and online content in multi-platform environments for people who are blind or have low vision. Publication by Analysis and Research in Communications, ARC and Media Access Canada.

The purpose of video description is to support and reflect the entertainment qualities of the content through description of the visual stimuli and style conveyed. 
 
Visual elements that are often overlooked by describers include title and end credits, subtitles and captions. Commercials and online content that stand alone or serve to support a program should also be described. Visual elements necessary to understand and enjoy the entertainment experience are described in this publication. 

Strategies for Funding the Human Rights of People with Disabilities



Funders could employ many different strategies and approaches to advance the human rights of people with disabilities. After extensive field consultations, several overarching recommendations for disability grantmaking are outlined in this report.

The disability funding field remains open and relatively untainted by common grantmaking pitfalls. As the field grows, it is important for funders to continue to support the active participation of PWDs at all levels of activity, and to nurture collaboration and collective learning experiences. The recommendations in this report summarize the learning of current funders as well as the advice of the grantseekers themselves.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons With Disabilities (Russian Version)



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

UNIC Moscow (United Nations Information Centre - Moscow) has translated the English version of the kit to Russian. For more information on the translation initiative by UNIC Moscow visit: http://www.unic.ru/news_inf/viewer.php?uid=164

Shifting Perspectives: Opening Up Museums and Galleries to Blind and Partially Sighted People



Shifting Perspectives: Opening up museums and galleries to blind and partially sighted people, a research initiative of CultureLink, supported by RNIB (2011)

The museum experience of disabled people is beginning to be talked of as a human and cultural right. Indeed, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ratified by the UK in 2009, recognises the right of disabled people to take part in culture “on equal terms”. This is a major shift.

Shifting Perspectives, seeing disabled people as part of the design solution and not the problem, will renew museums. This user-focused report gives a step-by-step approach to making cultural institutions accessible to the blind and partially sighted people.

FCC-EAAC Report on Emergency Calling for Persons with Disabilities, 2011



This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-first Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010

This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission), contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA), signed into law by President Obama on 8 October 2010.

The CVAA requires the Commission to take various steps to ensure that people with disabilities have access to emerging communications technologies in the 21st century. The Commission established the EAAC in accordance with the CVAA, which directs that an advisory committee be established within 60 days after the date of enactment, for the purpose of achieving equal access to emergency services by individuals with disabilities as part of our nation’s migration to a national Internet protocol-enabled emergency network, also known as the next generation 9-1-1 system.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communities



This report explains what we have learned about the potential of geo-data for accessible travel. It also offers suggestions to interested stake holders about next steps toward the realization of this potential.

This report is a result of discussions that took place in July 2010 commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at the White House. Participants of the discussion were asked to focus on the challenge of more accessible travel, transportation, and tourism by applying geo-data.
 
User needs should form the basis of any initiative aimed at improving transportation information services for people with disabilities. In the field of assistive technologies, mobile devices, have emerged as a champion for accomodating user needs. Mobile technology has helped inform and empower citizens of all ages and abilities to accomplish safe and independent travel around our country.
 

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, May 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this May 2008 issue focuses on The House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet hearing discussing the draft legislation "Enhancing Access to Broadband Technology and Services for Persons with Disabilities."

Web Accessibility at General Electric



Preety Kumar, Founder, President, and CEO of Deque Systems, Inc., discusses the significance of web accessibility and how General Electric recognized the necessity of accessible techniques in regards to making Web sites accessible to persons with disabilities.

Speech by World Blind Union (WBU) President on the Occassion of the Launching of the "Global Right to Read" Campaign



Read the speech made by WBU President Dr. William Rowland in Amsterdam on Wednesday 23rd April 2008 on the occasion of WBU’s Press Conference launching the Global Right to Read Campaign. This document also contains a press release announcing the launch of the Global Right to Read Campaign.

Joint ANEC-EDF Position on eAccessibility



This joint ANEC/EDF position paper expresses views on the accessibility of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) products and services by consumers of all ages and abilities.

Making a Difference: A Quarterly Magazine of the Georgia Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities



This Spring 2008 issue of "Making a Difference" features a wide range of articles including one about the 10th Annual Disability Day where over 2,000 people came to hear Ambassador Luis Gallegos, G3ict Chair, speak on the steps of the Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia. Also featured towards the end of the publication is "Creating an Accessible World with the United Nations Convention," an article written by G3ict Executive Director Axel Leblois.

To read about the 10th Annual Disability Day with Ambassador Gallegos, please turn to page 12-15.

To read Axel Leblois' article on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, please turn to page 24.

An Avatar Based Approach for Automatic Interpretation of Text to Sign Language



Written by Mohamed Jemni and Oussama Elghoul, this paper describes a current project at the University of Tunis to develop, for the deaf community, a tool facilitating communication through the Web. The aim of this tool is to interpret automatically texts in visual-gestural-spatial language by using Avatar technology.


State of the eNation Accessibility Reports: Social Networking Web sites



Today many services are only available, or offered at a discounted rate on the Internet. Other Web sites provide vital information or functionality. If a Web site doesn't meet a base level of accessibility then it will be impossible for a large number of disabled visitors to use. Many others with some sort of limiting condition will also have great difficulty.

 

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) First Report on the Findings of the Survey of User Needs (SUN)



Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) first report on the findings of a new study aimed at surveying user needs vis-a-vis wireless technologies. The people surveyed represent a large portion of the 40 million Americans with disabilities.

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

IBM Italy - Mobile Wireless Accessibility Project



IBM Italy's white paper on its Mobile Wireless Accessibility (MWA) project.

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.