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Publications & Reports

Smart Cities for All



Smart Cities for All, a Global Strategy for Digital Inclusion proposed by G3ict and World Enabled.

In June of 2016, G3ict and World Enabled launched the Defining Accessible Smart Cities initiative to understand how Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are being made available to persons with disabilities in Smart Cities.

The G3ict and World Enabled initiative included three separate data gathering strategies: a survey of more than 250 Global Experts, a series of roundtable discussions in global Smart Cities (Barcelona, London, Quito, New York, and San Francisco), and one-on-one interviews with numerous Smart City program managers and technologists. 

This vision document outlines six key interrelated strategies that can address the barriers and priority steps identified by global experts to support more accessible Smart Cities.

GAATES Toolkit: Key Indicators of Accessibility - Reporting on the UN CRPD



“This report was initiated and funded by The Delta Centre at the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs”. The objective of the report was to develop a toolkit that identifies key indicators on Universal Design and Accessibility in a national and international context. Published by GAATES in June 2015.

The toolkit serves to inform States Parties and is a model for signatories to the UNCRPD. Additionally, it fosters a higher level of understanding of accessibility and universal design around the world. The toolkit identifies a set of indicators that may be relevant when the signatories compile their reports to the UN on development in the area of universal design, in accordance with their obligations to UNCRPD, especially Article 9 on Accessibility. It provides an overview of accessibility/universal design indicators and measures that have been reported on by signatories to the CRPD.

The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive



People living with disabilities in low-income countries are the world's poorest people. Of the billlion people with disabilities worldwide, 80% are in developing countries and within those countries, they are generally among the poorest and most excluded. But until recently, women, men, girls and boys with disabilities have remained largely on the margins of global development actions. Published by CBM UK | April 2015.

In 'The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive', CBM shares its experiences of implementing disabillity-inclusive development and what has been learned from them. The publication is the first of a series on disability-inclusive development, aimed at people working in the development and disability sector, professionals, partners and policy-makers, as well as anyone interested in the work of CBM and disability-inclusive development.

Zero Project Report 2014: International Study on the Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



Our mission is working for a world with zero barriers. Worldwide, the Zero Project finds and shares models that improve the daily lives and legal rights of all persons with disabilities. The focus of the year 2014 is accessibility.

The 20 indicators from the 'Convention Questionnaire' measure the implementation of some of the most important rights (articles) of the UN CRPD. Analyse the answers of experts in currently 132 countries, shown on world maps.
 
Also see: CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - researched by G3ict and DPI | Download Report.

Towards an Inclusive and Accessible Future for All



Persons with disabilities have a significant positive impact on society, and their contributions can be even greater if we remove barriers to their participation. With more than one billion persons with disabilities in our world today, this is more important than ever. Published by United Nations Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 2013

While data on disability remain a challenge, there is compelling evidence of the barriers that persons with disabilities face in achieving economic and social inclusion. As the 2015 deadline for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the global community is discussing a new development framework that will build on the progress catalysed by the Millennium Declaration.

Human Rights Watch Report: Barriers Everywhere: Accessibility for People with Disabilities in Russia



This report highlights obstacles such as the inability of people with physical disabilities to leave their homes due to lack of ramps and elevators, employers’ unwillingness to hire people with disabilities, and inadequate visual and auditory announcements on buses for people with sensory disabilities. Human Rights Watch urges Russia to make meaningful reforms to transportation, housing, and workplaces, among other facets of society | Published by Human Rights Watch, September 2013

Russia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2012 and will host the Winter Paralympics in March 2014. Despite these high profile steps the government has taken to demonstrate its commitment to accessibility, people living with disabilities in Russia face challenges carrying out basic daily tasks, including going to work or to school, visiting the doctor, shopping for groceries or medicine, attending cultural events, or socializing with friends.

Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion



Successful businesses recognize that incorporating disability in all diversity and inclusion practices positively impacts their companies’ bottom line. Corporate CEOs understand that it’s cost effective to recruit and retain the best talent regardless of disability. Published by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, 2013.

As a collaborative initiative to share creative inclusion practices that succeed, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited congressional and business leaders to participate in the second Corporate Disability
Employment Summit: Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion. Prior to the summit, business leaders were asked to share their successful disability inclusion strategies. This publication highlights these strategies, which businesses of all sizes can use to create a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and supply chain.

UNICEF The State of the World's Children 2013: Children with Disabilities



Given opportunities to flourish as others might, children with disabilities have the potential to lead fulfilling lives and to contribute to the social, cultural and economic vitality of their communities – as the personal essays in this volume attest. Published by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) May 2013

Under the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), governments around the world have taken upon themselves the responsibility of ensuring that all children, irrespective of ability or disability, enjoy their rights without discrimination of any kind.

United Nations Resource: Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in all Aspects of Development Efforts



The concept of mainstreaming disability in development is broadly defined as the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development efforts. The concept of inclusive development is enshrined in article 32 of the CRPD—the first stand-alone provision on international cooperation in a core human rights treaty | Published by the United Nations, November 2011

This document is divided into four main sections. Following a brief introduction, section II will focus on the initial criteria for the assessment of best practices. Section III presents a number of recommendations, suggesting also how the United Nations can facilitate the process of mainstreaming disability and persons with disabilities in development and highlighting the interlinkages between the mainstreaming of disability and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and section IV contains 26 case studies from across the globe.

Active Ageing Index 2012 for 27 EU Member States



The Active Ageing Index (AAI) is a newly developed tool that offers national and European policy-makers a way to measure and promote the untapped potential of the older population. In its design, the index follows the conceptual framework of the 2012 European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations | Published by the European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Vienna | December 2012

The index measures the active ageing performance across four distinct domains that together capture the untapped potential of older people across EU Member States:
1. Employment of older workers;
2. Social activity and participation of older people;
3. Independent and autonomous living of older persons; and
4. Capacity and enabling environment for active ageing.

Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific



The Incheon Strategy provides the Asian and Pacific region, and the world, with the first set of regionally agreed disability-inclusive development goals. It builds on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and will enable the Asian and Pacific region to track progress towards improving the quality of life, and the fulfilment of the rights, of the region’s 650 million persons with disabilities. Published by United Nations ESCAP, 2012.

Similar to the Millennium Development Goals, the Incheon goals and targets are time-bound for accelerating implementation by focusing particular attention on the achievement of a set of priority goals and targets during the course of the new Decade, 2013–2022, as well as facilitating the measurement of progress to be attained by countries and territories in the Asia-Pacific region.
 
Also see: CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report, 2nd Edition, published by G3ict and Disabled Peoples' International 

Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Accessibility of Public Sector Bodies' Websites



This explanatory memorandum presents in further detail the proposal for a new Directive aiming at the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of the Member States on the accessibility of websites from public sector bodies | Published by the European Commission on December 3, 2012

Web-accessibility refers to principles and techniques to be obeserved when constructing websites, in order to render the content of these websites accessible to all users, in particular those with disabilities. Web-accessibility is of great importance for public sector bodies, to extend their reach and to fulfil their public responsibilities. Harmonization will lead to better market conditions, more jobs, cheaper web-accessibility and more accessible websites: a triple win for governments, businesses, and citizens.

Better Design and Buildings for Everyone: Disabled People’s Rights and the Built Environment



The ability to move through the world independently and safely allows disabled people access to and the ability to participate in communities, education, health services, recreation, and make social connections. Access to the built environment is therefore a fundamental human right | Published by New Zealand's Human Rights Commission October 2012

This report covers buildings in particular and looks at:
1. the Commission’s experience in accessibility issues relating to the built environment
2. the relevant international standards and domestic legislation
3. overseas approaches to the issue
4. ideas to improve accessibility in the future.

Assistive Technology as a Means of Supporting People with Dementia: A Review



This paper reviews the current policy and practice in relation to Assistive Technology supporting people to live well with dementia, including different housing settings and rounding off with some good practice case studies which highlight the wide array of technology solutions available | Written for the U.K.'s Housing Learning & Improvement Network by Steve Bonner and Tahir Idris, Assistive Technology consultants | Published July 2012

Included in this thorough review are:
- Definitions and a brief summary of different types of AT
- A review of policy initiatives, including legislation, which have
attempted to encourage the greater use of AT
- Ethical considerations
- Current practice by major housing providers
- Good practice examples
- People with dementia’s experience
- Further reading links

Ageing in the Twenty-First Century: A Celebration and A Challenge



This timely report aims to raise awareness about the speed of population ageing and, more generally, about the experience of being old in our changing world. It recommends moving urgently to incorporate ageing issues into national development plans and poverty reduction strategies | Published by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), New York, and HelpAge International, London, 2012

This report, a collaborative effort of the United Nations and other major international organizations working in the area of population ageing, sheds light on progress towards implementing this Plan. It utilizes both a quantitative approach analysing policies and actions, and a qualitative approach bringing the voices of older persons themselves into the heart of the discussion.

Equity for Women with Disabilities in India: National Commission for Women, India



This is a strategy paper prepared for the National Commission for Women, India. Disabled women in India face numerous challenges. In the absence of well coordinated government policies aimed at integrating disabled people in mainstream activities, disabled women live under extremely difficult conditions, for not only are they women but most of them are in the rural areas. The women with disabilities in India are discriminated against equality. Discrimination deprives disabled women of vital life experiences, and therefore by denying them the opportunity to participate fully in community affairs they are deprived of equality of opportunity | 2012

Around the world, women make up just over 51% of the population. Women with disabilities are the most marginalized in Indian society. They are deprived of political, Social, Economic, and health opportunities. The problems of women with disabilities become very complex with other factors such as social stigma and poverty.

The Digital Dimension of Healthcare



Policymakers are faced with three core challenges in healthcare: growth in costs outpacing growth in GDP; uneven quality in outcomes and patient experience; and inadequate access to care in many regions. Traditional solutions have been insufficient to address these challenges. What is needed is a fundamental re-invention. A key component of that solution is innovation from digital and social media | Report of the Digital Innovation in Healthcare Working Group 2012

Thanks to digital and social media, connectivity has soared, bringing unprecedented numbers of people into contact, and delivering better health outcomes at lower cost. It is also empowering people to participate more actively in their own health, providing novel tools to manage chronic conditions, and easing the burden on overstretched healthcare systems. And by hugely expanding access to data, the Internet has given rise to continuous learning systems and created feedback loops between medical advances and clinical practice. These changes are opening up opportunities for new entrants – smartphone health apps now number in the tens of thousands, for instance – while presenting both threats and opportunities for incumbents.

National Council on Disability: Progress Report 2011



This annual progress report by the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes the current state of people with disabilities in America. Findings are based on information gathered through a variety of events with NCD stakeholders; the most recent figures from an extensive set of national data indicators measuring the quality of life of people with disabilities in the United States; and recent studies and reports from NCD | National Council on Disability, October 2011

This report contains many recommendations for improving the quality of life of people with disabilities. Given that the comprehensive reform of our nation‘s approach to disability policy will be a long-term process, immediate priority should be given to the recommendations that will lead to better education outcomes and increased employment and independent living opportunities for people with disabilities.
 
Also see: The Accessibility Imperative: Challenges and Opportunities of Implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Download report for free.

PEW Report: Americans Living with Disability and their Technology Profile



Using the internet can be a challenge for people living with disabilities. Two percent of American adults say they have a disability or illness that makes it harder or impossible for them to use the internet. The Pew Internet Project provides the following data as context for the continuing conversation about who does – and does not – use the internet in the U.S., including a proposal to extend the enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act to include websites operated by certain entities. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project | January 2011

Statistically speaking, disability is associated with being older, less educated, and living in a lower-income household. By contrast, internet use is statistically associated with being younger, college-educated, and living in a higher-income household. Thus, it is not surprising that people living with disability report lower rates of internet access than other adults. However, when all of these demographic factors are controlled, living with a disability in and of itself is negatively correlated with someone’s likelihood to have internet access.

BRAID - Bridging Research in Ageing and ICT Development



This document reports on the operational results of the BRAID project and includes details of the BRAID taxonomy, stakeholder co-ordination mechanism and engagement, the vision and the roadmap and its implementation. The results are synthesised into key recommendations to guide future European Commission research on ICT for active ageing.

Bridging Research in Ageing and Information and Communication Technology Development (BRAID) seeks to unleash the potential of technology as a vehicle to enable people to achieve their full capacity. To this end, BRAID has engaged with key stakeholders to develop a comprehensive Research and Technological Development (RTD) Roadmap for Ageing.

Transforming Learning Through mEducation



Mobile technology is raising the quality of education and improving access to it. Early initiatives in mobile education, or “mEducation” are already enhancing learning outcomes worldwide. With growing availability and demand, mEducation is poised to become a USD 70 billion market by 2020 | GSMA and McKinsey & Company | 2012

We define mEducation as technology-enabled learning solutions available to learners anytime, anywhere. Any portable device, such as a tablet, laptop or mobile phone, that provides access to educational content through mobile connectivity (2G, 3G, or 4G complemented by mobile-based Wi-Fi) can be a tool for mEducation. Mobile technology’s power to transform education is difficult to overstate, given the importance and impact of learning that takes place outside a traditional classroom environment.

The Global Economics of Disability



The intent of this paper is to inform those grappling with how to position disability as a new market segment, and speak to the market in an economic context | Fifth Quadrant Analytics and Return on Disability Company | March 2012

Making up 1.1 billion people globally, Persons with Disabilities represent a sizeable population. Unlocking the potential in this large subset of the global community has serious ramifications for GDP, public and private institutional cash flows and how economies grapple with an aging population. The familiar emerging market investing question must be asked: when does this market tip? When does the global platform of disability mirror the scope and revenue generating power of Green?

Forced Migration Review Issue 35: Disability and Displacement



The feature theme articles in this issue of FMR show why disabled people who are displaced need particular consideration, and highlight some of the initiatives taken (locally and at the global level) to change thinking and practices so that their vulnerability is recognized, their voices heard – and responses made inclusive | University of Oxford, Refugee Studies Centre | July 2010

An oft-quoted statistic is the World Health Organisation’s estimate that persons with disabilities account for 7-10% of the world’s population. This would imply that there are three to four million persons living with disability among the world’s 42 million displaced. It is not (yet) common practice, however, to include people with disabilities among those who are considered as particularly vulnerable in disasters and displacement and who therefore require targeted response.

UK Parliament Human Rights Committee: The Summary of the Report on Implementation of the Right of Disabled People to Independent Living



This report is a easy-read summary of the UK Parliament's Joint Committee on Human Rights report on Article 19 of the UN CRPD, 'Implementation of the Right of Disabled People to Independent Living' | February 2011

Article 19 is all about living independently and being included in the community. Because the UK has agreed to these rules, the governments across the UK should be making sure that all disabled people, including people with learning disabilities, have the same rights as everyone else to: live in the community, have the same choices, be fully included and take part in community, choose where to live, choose who to live with and other choices.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – What Role for Philanthropy?



The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – what role for Philanthropy? is a paper presented by Professor Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre for Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2010 International Human Rights Funders Group conference held at San Francisco, California.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is anchored on the view that the person with the disability is not the problem.  Remember what Theresia Degener says – traditional disability law and policy ‘problematizes the person’. The problem resides in how third parties (including the State) reacts to disability. This is reflected in the definition of disability in Article 1 of the Convention: disability does not exist in the abstract. It is a function of how impairment is compounded by arbitrary barriers placed in front of people.

Travelling with Hearing Loss Research



Travelling with Hearing Loss, commissioned by the New Zealand National Foundation for the Deaf, aims to establish what people with hearing loss want in terms of tourism products and services, and to offer a better understanding of Access Tourism as a legitimate tourism market.

In 2011, the New Zealand National Foundation for the Deaf (NFD) commissioned the New Zealand Tourism Research Institute (NZTRI) to conduct research into the tourism, travel, and hospitality experiences and needs of people with hearing impairments.

Hearing impairment ranges from slight hearing loss to total loss. The research was led by Dr. Sandra Rhodda, Research Programme Leader in Access Tourism. The research included two surveys, one for residents of New Zealand and one for residents of countries other than New Zealand who are deaf or have hearing loss and who are 20 years old or older. The aim of the research was to find out what it is like to travel with hearing loss, and how the travel experiences of hearing impaired people can be improved.

 

A Community for All: Implementing Article 19



A Guide for Monitoring Progress on the Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This guide and checklist were developed as part of a project of the Mental Health Initiative and the Law and Health Initiative of the Open Society Public Health Program | Open Society Foundations, December 2012

The Community for All guide and checklist offers a detailed look at the rights identified in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), especially Article 19 of the CRPD which provides for the right to live independently and be included in the community. The guide and checklist are intended to help advocates and program implementers identify the obligations on States to realize these rights. Community for All promotes the right of all people with disabilities to live and participate in the community as equal citizens, particularly in countries in which people with disabilities continue to be segregated in institutions.

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities: Recommendation or Mandatory Treaty?



The Information Society Project at Yale Law School Releases White Paper Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities

This Working Paper addresses the proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities. The authors conclude that if WIPO wants to achieve compliance, this proposed instrument should be binding hard law. Enacting this agreement as soft law would undermine the goal of making copyrighted works accessible to persons with print disabilities.
 
Authors: Margot Kaminski, Yale University - Yale Information Society Project; Yale University - Information Society Project; Yale University - Law School; Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, Yale Law School; ONO Academic College; Yale University - Information Society Project

The Design of Human-Powered Access Technology



In this paper, the authors frame recent developments in human computation in the historical context of accessibility, and outline a framework for discussing new advances in human-powered access technology. Authors: Jeffrey P. Bigham, Richard E. Ladner and Yevgen Borodin.

People with disabilities have always overcome accessibility problems by enlisting people in their community to help. The Internet has broadened the available community and made it easier to get on-demand assistance remotely. In particular, the past few years have seen the development of technology in both research and industry that uses human power to overcome technical problems too difficult to solve automatically.
 
The paper presents a set of 13 design principles for humanpowered access technology motivated both by historical context and current technological developments. We then demonstrate the utility of these principles by using them to compare several existing human-powered access technologies. 

The Effectiveness of M-Health Technologies for Improving Health and Health Services: A Systematic Review



This systematic review will summarize the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-Health) around the world. Authors: Caroline Free, Gemma Phillips; Lambert Felix; Leandro Galli; Vikram Patel; Philip Edwards; BMC Research Notes

M-health, the use of mobile computing and communication technologies in health care and public health, is a rapidly expanding area of research and practice. M-health programmes and interventions use mobile electronic devices (MEDs), such as personal digital assistants and mobile phones, for a range of functions to support health behaviour change and chronic disease management by patients in the community.
 
This systematic review will provide recommendations on the use of mobile computing and communication technology in health care and public health and will guide future work on intervention development and primary research in this field.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons With Disabilities (Russian Version)



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

UNIC Moscow (United Nations Information Centre - Moscow) has translated the English version of the kit to Russian. For more information on the translation initiative by UNIC Moscow visit: http://www.unic.ru/news_inf/viewer.php?uid=164

The Clear Print Standard: Arguments for a Flexible Approach



This report makes recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version of the Clear Print guidelines published by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) for adoption within the public sector.

As well as Large Print for people with impaired vision, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) also publishes Clear Print guidelines for general use. These have been widely adopted in the public sector. In these notes we take a critical look at what they say about type size, and the evidence on which the standard is based. We support the idea of a minimum type size for normal text, but question the inflexibility which inhibits some organisations from using even slightly smaller sizes for diagrams and tables – features that can make information clearer. We make recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version.

FCC-EAAC Report on Emergency Calling for Persons with Disabilities, 2011



This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-first Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010

This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission), contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA), signed into law by President Obama on 8 October 2010.

The CVAA requires the Commission to take various steps to ensure that people with disabilities have access to emerging communications technologies in the 21st century. The Commission established the EAAC in accordance with the CVAA, which directs that an advisory committee be established within 60 days after the date of enactment, for the purpose of achieving equal access to emergency services by individuals with disabilities as part of our nation’s migration to a national Internet protocol-enabled emergency network, also known as the next generation 9-1-1 system.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communities



This report explains what we have learned about the potential of geo-data for accessible travel. It also offers suggestions to interested stake holders about next steps toward the realization of this potential.

This report is a result of discussions that took place in July 2010 commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at the White House. Participants of the discussion were asked to focus on the challenge of more accessible travel, transportation, and tourism by applying geo-data.
 
User needs should form the basis of any initiative aimed at improving transportation information services for people with disabilities. In the field of assistive technologies, mobile devices, have emerged as a champion for accomodating user needs. Mobile technology has helped inform and empower citizens of all ages and abilities to accomplish safe and independent travel around our country.
 

Accessibility, Innovation and Sustainability at AT&T



A G3ict White Paper Documenting How Mobile Service Providers Can Serve Persons with Disabilities and Seniors

In order to promote the business practices required to provide accessible and assistive mobile equipment and services to persons with disabilities, G3ict requested that AT&T opens its doors to review and document its internal R&D and business processes for the benefit all interested parties. Read more.

 

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

NTT DOCOMO's Mobile Phones for Persons with Disabilities



In his presentation, Mr. Ryuji Nagata, Manager of Product Department, NTT DOCOMO Inc., Japan reviews: (1) Japanese cell phone market; (2) Universal design approach in NTT DOCOMO; (3) What is Raku-Raku phone?; (4) New features of Raku-Raku phone; (5) Bone condyction receiver "Sound Leaf."

In his presentation, Mr. Ryuji Nagata, Manager of Product Department, NTT DOCOMO Inc., Japan reviews: (1) Japanese cell phone market; (2) Universal design approach in NTT DOCOMO; (3) What is Raku-Raku phone?; (4) New features of Raku-Raku phone; (5) Bone condyction receiver "Sound Leaf."

A Case Study of One of the Most Successful Programs Designed by a Higher Education Institution to Promote Employability among Students Living with Disability



Written by Professor Licia Sbattella, President's Delegate for Disabilities at Politecnico di Milano, Italy, this case study will be presented at the 4th Shafallah International Forum on Children with Special Needs: Achieving Independence, Doha, Qatar, April 20-22.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, May 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this May 2008 issue focuses on The House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet hearing discussing the draft legislation "Enhancing Access to Broadband Technology and Services for Persons with Disabilities."

Speech by World Blind Union (WBU) President on the Occassion of the Launching of the "Global Right to Read" Campaign



Read the speech made by WBU President Dr. William Rowland in Amsterdam on Wednesday 23rd April 2008 on the occasion of WBU’s Press Conference launching the Global Right to Read Campaign. This document also contains a press release announcing the launch of the Global Right to Read Campaign.

Joint ANEC-EDF Position on eAccessibility



This joint ANEC/EDF position paper expresses views on the accessibility of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) products and services by consumers of all ages and abilities.

Making a Difference: A Quarterly Magazine of the Georgia Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities



This Spring 2008 issue of "Making a Difference" features a wide range of articles including one about the 10th Annual Disability Day where over 2,000 people came to hear Ambassador Luis Gallegos, G3ict Chair, speak on the steps of the Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia. Also featured towards the end of the publication is "Creating an Accessible World with the United Nations Convention," an article written by G3ict Executive Director Axel Leblois.

To read about the 10th Annual Disability Day with Ambassador Gallegos, please turn to page 12-15.

To read Axel Leblois' article on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, please turn to page 24.

An Avatar Based Approach for Automatic Interpretation of Text to Sign Language



Written by Mohamed Jemni and Oussama Elghoul, this paper describes a current project at the University of Tunis to develop, for the deaf community, a tool facilitating communication through the Web. The aim of this tool is to interpret automatically texts in visual-gestural-spatial language by using Avatar technology.


State of the eNation Accessibility Reports: Social Networking Web sites



Today many services are only available, or offered at a discounted rate on the Internet. Other Web sites provide vital information or functionality. If a Web site doesn't meet a base level of accessibility then it will be impossible for a large number of disabled visitors to use. Many others with some sort of limiting condition will also have great difficulty.

 

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) First Report on the Findings of the Survey of User Needs (SUN)



Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) first report on the findings of a new study aimed at surveying user needs vis-a-vis wireless technologies. The people surveyed represent a large portion of the 40 million Americans with disabilities.

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

NPR's Accessible Digital Radio Project



NPR's Accessible Digital Radio Project PowerPoint presentation.

IBM Italy - Mobile Wireless Accessibility Project



IBM Italy's white paper on its Mobile Wireless Accessibility (MWA) project.

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.