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Publications & Reports

GAATES Toolkit: Key Indicators of Accessibility - Reporting on the UN CRPD



“This report was initiated and funded by The Delta Centre at the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs”. The objective of the report was to develop a toolkit that identifies key indicators on Universal Design and Accessibility in a national and international context. Published by GAATES in June 2015.

The toolkit serves to inform States Parties and is a model for signatories to the UNCRPD. Additionally, it fosters a higher level of understanding of accessibility and universal design around the world. The toolkit identifies a set of indicators that may be relevant when the signatories compile their reports to the UN on development in the area of universal design, in accordance with their obligations to UNCRPD, especially Article 9 on Accessibility. It provides an overview of accessibility/universal design indicators and measures that have been reported on by signatories to the CRPD.

The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive



People living with disabilities in low-income countries are the world's poorest people. Of the billlion people with disabilities worldwide, 80% are in developing countries and within those countries, they are generally among the poorest and most excluded. But until recently, women, men, girls and boys with disabilities have remained largely on the margins of global development actions. Published by CBM UK | April 2015.

In 'The Future is Inclusive: How to make International Development Disability-Inclusive', CBM shares its experiences of implementing disabillity-inclusive development and what has been learned from them. The publication is the first of a series on disability-inclusive development, aimed at people working in the development and disability sector, professionals, partners and policy-makers, as well as anyone interested in the work of CBM and disability-inclusive development.

UNWTO's Manual on Accessible Tourism for All



The Manual on Accessible Tourism for All: Public-Private Alliances and Good Practices is the first publication of a technical nature produced by the UNWTO in collaboration with the ACS Foundation.

The Manual highlights the value of accessible heritage and cultural resources and provides the necessary technical knowledge for making built and natural tourism environments accessible within the framework of public-private alliances. The extensive experience of the ACS Foundation in these areas has served to stimulate the development of activities and products that make it possible to turn universal access in tourism into reality. The most significant actions are featured in this publication and represent best practices that can inspire other actors that may wish to adapt them to their respective realities.

Zero Project Report 2014: International Study on the Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



Our mission is working for a world with zero barriers. Worldwide, the Zero Project finds and shares models that improve the daily lives and legal rights of all persons with disabilities. The focus of the year 2014 is accessibility.

The 20 indicators from the 'Convention Questionnaire' measure the implementation of some of the most important rights (articles) of the UN CRPD. Analyse the answers of experts in currently 132 countries, shown on world maps.
 
Also see: CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - researched by G3ict and DPI | Download Report.

From Exclusion to Equality: The Rights of Persons with Disabilities, a Handbook for Parliamentarians



This is a handbook for parliamentarians on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol. Published by the Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities - United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN-DESA) and Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), 2007

Parliaments and parliamentarians have a key role to play in promoting and protecting human rights. This Handbook aims to assist parliamentarians and others in efforts to realize the Convention so that persons with disabilities can achieve the transition from exclusion to equality. The Handbook seeks to raise awareness of the Convention and its provisions, promote an appreciation of disability concerns, and assist parliaments in understanding the mechanisms and frameworks needed to translate the Convention into practice.

Towards an Inclusive and Accessible Future for All



Persons with disabilities have a significant positive impact on society, and their contributions can be even greater if we remove barriers to their participation. With more than one billion persons with disabilities in our world today, this is more important than ever. Published by United Nations Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 2013

While data on disability remain a challenge, there is compelling evidence of the barriers that persons with disabilities face in achieving economic and social inclusion. As the 2015 deadline for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the global community is discussing a new development framework that will build on the progress catalysed by the Millennium Declaration.

Human Rights Watch Report: Barriers Everywhere: Accessibility for People with Disabilities in Russia



This report highlights obstacles such as the inability of people with physical disabilities to leave their homes due to lack of ramps and elevators, employers’ unwillingness to hire people with disabilities, and inadequate visual and auditory announcements on buses for people with sensory disabilities. Human Rights Watch urges Russia to make meaningful reforms to transportation, housing, and workplaces, among other facets of society | Published by Human Rights Watch, September 2013

Russia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2012 and will host the Winter Paralympics in March 2014. Despite these high profile steps the government has taken to demonstrate its commitment to accessibility, people living with disabilities in Russia face challenges carrying out basic daily tasks, including going to work or to school, visiting the doctor, shopping for groceries or medicine, attending cultural events, or socializing with friends.

UNICEF The State of the World's Children 2013: Children with Disabilities



Given opportunities to flourish as others might, children with disabilities have the potential to lead fulfilling lives and to contribute to the social, cultural and economic vitality of their communities – as the personal essays in this volume attest. Published by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) May 2013

Under the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), governments around the world have taken upon themselves the responsibility of ensuring that all children, irrespective of ability or disability, enjoy their rights without discrimination of any kind.

Better Design and Buildings for Everyone: Disabled People’s Rights and the Built Environment



The ability to move through the world independently and safely allows disabled people access to and the ability to participate in communities, education, health services, recreation, and make social connections. Access to the built environment is therefore a fundamental human right | Published by New Zealand's Human Rights Commission October 2012

This report covers buildings in particular and looks at:
1. the Commission’s experience in accessibility issues relating to the built environment
2. the relevant international standards and domestic legislation
3. overseas approaches to the issue
4. ideas to improve accessibility in the future.

Inclusive Play Design Guide



This Inclusive Play Design Guide has been developed by a group of playground and child development experts as an inspirational resource to guide the creation of great outdoor play environments for everyone. Published by Playworld Systems | May 2012

This design guide is essential for the future of playground design when considering the high number of people affected by disability in the United States. According to the United States Census, 12% of the population has a severe disability that affects at least one function of daily living. But this group of people does not live in a vacuum; they have parents, siblings and grandparents who are involved in their daily lives. So in actuality, more than 36% of the population is touched by severe disability – 1 in 3 people. Disability challenges how affected individuals and their families go to school, go to work, and even spend the day at a park.
 
Also read: Doing Transport Differently: How to Access Public Transport for Persons with Disabilities. Download here.

National Council on Disability: Progress Report 2011



This annual progress report by the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes the current state of people with disabilities in America. Findings are based on information gathered through a variety of events with NCD stakeholders; the most recent figures from an extensive set of national data indicators measuring the quality of life of people with disabilities in the United States; and recent studies and reports from NCD | National Council on Disability, October 2011

This report contains many recommendations for improving the quality of life of people with disabilities. Given that the comprehensive reform of our nation‘s approach to disability policy will be a long-term process, immediate priority should be given to the recommendations that will lead to better education outcomes and increased employment and independent living opportunities for people with disabilities.
 
Also see: The Accessibility Imperative: Challenges and Opportunities of Implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Download report for free.

PEW Report: Americans Living with Disability and their Technology Profile



Using the internet can be a challenge for people living with disabilities. Two percent of American adults say they have a disability or illness that makes it harder or impossible for them to use the internet. The Pew Internet Project provides the following data as context for the continuing conversation about who does – and does not – use the internet in the U.S., including a proposal to extend the enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act to include websites operated by certain entities. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project | January 2011

Statistically speaking, disability is associated with being older, less educated, and living in a lower-income household. By contrast, internet use is statistically associated with being younger, college-educated, and living in a higher-income household. Thus, it is not surprising that people living with disability report lower rates of internet access than other adults. However, when all of these demographic factors are controlled, living with a disability in and of itself is negatively correlated with someone’s likelihood to have internet access.

Disability Expectations: Investing in a Better Life, a Stronger Australia



The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) was put forward by the Productivity Commission in its report Disability Care and Support, which was submitted to government on 31 July 2011 and publicly released by the Prime Minister on 10 August 2011. The NDIS proposes a way forward for Australia.

PwC brought together an expert team with extensive experience in the disability support system. The aim of the group has been to answer the question “What is required to deliver the NDIS?” This paper provides a brief history of disability in Australia and, as part of its focus, draws on international experience and comparisons. Published by PwC | November 2011

Making Television Accessible - Polish Edition



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | Polish translation courtesy: National Broadcasting Council of Poland (Krajowej Rady Radiofonii i Telewizji) | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives, regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV.

International Impact of the United Nations Convention the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – A New Engine of Reform



This is a paper presented by Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre on Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2009 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium.

Excerpt: "To see a theory of justice embodied in a single instrument – in a single piece of law – lives one confidence in the possibility of seeking justice through law. That is precisely why the Americans with Disabilities Act lit a fire that spread rapidly throughout the world. And so it is with the new United National Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. I once wrote that while disability rights is an American invention, it is now truly a global challenge. I want to talk about why such a convention was deemed necessary. The real added‐value of the convention lies in its ability to trigger a new kind of disability politics worldwide. For without a new dynamic of change – one that can sustain itself – we will not see real change happening.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – What Role for Philanthropy?



The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – what role for Philanthropy? is a paper presented by Professor Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre for Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2010 International Human Rights Funders Group conference held at San Francisco, California.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is anchored on the view that the person with the disability is not the problem.  Remember what Theresia Degener says – traditional disability law and policy ‘problematizes the person’. The problem resides in how third parties (including the State) reacts to disability. This is reflected in the definition of disability in Article 1 of the Convention: disability does not exist in the abstract. It is a function of how impairment is compounded by arbitrary barriers placed in front of people.

Travelling with Hearing Loss Research



Travelling with Hearing Loss, commissioned by the New Zealand National Foundation for the Deaf, aims to establish what people with hearing loss want in terms of tourism products and services, and to offer a better understanding of Access Tourism as a legitimate tourism market.

In 2011, the New Zealand National Foundation for the Deaf (NFD) commissioned the New Zealand Tourism Research Institute (NZTRI) to conduct research into the tourism, travel, and hospitality experiences and needs of people with hearing impairments.

Hearing impairment ranges from slight hearing loss to total loss. The research was led by Dr. Sandra Rhodda, Research Programme Leader in Access Tourism. The research included two surveys, one for residents of New Zealand and one for residents of countries other than New Zealand who are deaf or have hearing loss and who are 20 years old or older. The aim of the research was to find out what it is like to travel with hearing loss, and how the travel experiences of hearing impaired people can be improved.

 

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Making Television Accessible



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives,  regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons  organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV. 

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - Polish version  
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

 

Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities: Recommendation or Mandatory Treaty?



The Information Society Project at Yale Law School Releases White Paper Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities

This Working Paper addresses the proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities. The authors conclude that if WIPO wants to achieve compliance, this proposed instrument should be binding hard law. Enacting this agreement as soft law would undermine the goal of making copyrighted works accessible to persons with print disabilities.
 
Authors: Margot Kaminski, Yale University - Yale Information Society Project; Yale University - Information Society Project; Yale University - Law School; Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, Yale Law School; ONO Academic College; Yale University - Information Society Project

Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook



The goal of “Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator’s Handbook” is to provide guidance to cultural administrators on accessibility and inclusion for creating new or opening up existing programs to include individuals with disabilities and older adults, whether as staff, volunteers, program participants or audience members. Produced by: National Endowment of the Arts, National Endowment of the Humanities, National Assembly of State Art Agencies, and John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Since the disability rights movement rose to prominence in the 1970s, federal legislation has been passed, and disabled individuals are finally becoming part of the cultural mainstream. Great strides have been made, particularly in architectural and program access. Many Americans with disabilities now have the opportunity to create and participate fully in the arts and humanities. Much work, however, remains to be done.
 
“Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook” represents an update of the Arts Endowment's "The Arts and 504” (1992) with additional information from the 700-page “Design for Accessibility: An Arts Administrator’s Guide” produced by the Arts Endowment and NASAA in 1994. This resource is designed to help you not only comply with Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, but to assist you in making access an integral part of your organization’s planning, mission, programs, outreach, meetings, budget and staffing.

The Design of Human-Powered Access Technology



In this paper, the authors frame recent developments in human computation in the historical context of accessibility, and outline a framework for discussing new advances in human-powered access technology. Authors: Jeffrey P. Bigham, Richard E. Ladner and Yevgen Borodin.

People with disabilities have always overcome accessibility problems by enlisting people in their community to help. The Internet has broadened the available community and made it easier to get on-demand assistance remotely. In particular, the past few years have seen the development of technology in both research and industry that uses human power to overcome technical problems too difficult to solve automatically.
 
The paper presents a set of 13 design principles for humanpowered access technology motivated both by historical context and current technological developments. We then demonstrate the utility of these principles by using them to compare several existing human-powered access technologies. 

Accessible Content: Best Practices Guide for Digital Environments



Video description should offer equivalent access to film, television and online content in multi-platform environments for people who are blind or have low vision. Publication by Analysis and Research in Communications, ARC and Media Access Canada.

The purpose of video description is to support and reflect the entertainment qualities of the content through description of the visual stimuli and style conveyed. 
 
Visual elements that are often overlooked by describers include title and end credits, subtitles and captions. Commercials and online content that stand alone or serve to support a program should also be described. Visual elements necessary to understand and enjoy the entertainment experience are described in this publication. 

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons With Disabilities (Russian Version)



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

UNIC Moscow (United Nations Information Centre - Moscow) has translated the English version of the kit to Russian. For more information on the translation initiative by UNIC Moscow visit: http://www.unic.ru/news_inf/viewer.php?uid=164

Shifting Perspectives: Opening Up Museums and Galleries to Blind and Partially Sighted People



Shifting Perspectives: Opening up museums and galleries to blind and partially sighted people, a research initiative of CultureLink, supported by RNIB (2011)

The museum experience of disabled people is beginning to be talked of as a human and cultural right. Indeed, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ratified by the UK in 2009, recognises the right of disabled people to take part in culture “on equal terms”. This is a major shift.

Shifting Perspectives, seeing disabled people as part of the design solution and not the problem, will renew museums. This user-focused report gives a step-by-step approach to making cultural institutions accessible to the blind and partially sighted people.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communities



This report explains what we have learned about the potential of geo-data for accessible travel. It also offers suggestions to interested stake holders about next steps toward the realization of this potential.

This report is a result of discussions that took place in July 2010 commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at the White House. Participants of the discussion were asked to focus on the challenge of more accessible travel, transportation, and tourism by applying geo-data.
 
User needs should form the basis of any initiative aimed at improving transportation information services for people with disabilities. In the field of assistive technologies, mobile devices, have emerged as a champion for accomodating user needs. Mobile technology has helped inform and empower citizens of all ages and abilities to accomplish safe and independent travel around our country.
 

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

Speech by World Blind Union (WBU) President on the Occassion of the Launching of the "Global Right to Read" Campaign



Read the speech made by WBU President Dr. William Rowland in Amsterdam on Wednesday 23rd April 2008 on the occasion of WBU’s Press Conference launching the Global Right to Read Campaign. This document also contains a press release announcing the launch of the Global Right to Read Campaign.

State of the eNation Accessibility Reports: Social Networking Web sites



Today many services are only available, or offered at a discounted rate on the Internet. Other Web sites provide vital information or functionality. If a Web site doesn't meet a base level of accessibility then it will be impossible for a large number of disabled visitors to use. Many others with some sort of limiting condition will also have great difficulty.

 

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) First Report on the Findings of the Survey of User Needs (SUN)



Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) first report on the findings of a new study aimed at surveying user needs vis-a-vis wireless technologies. The people surveyed represent a large portion of the 40 million Americans with disabilities.

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

IBM Italy - Mobile Wireless Accessibility Project



IBM Italy's white paper on its Mobile Wireless Accessibility (MWA) project.

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.